literateness


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Related to literateness: literate person, unlettered

lit·er·ate

 (lĭt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1.
a. Able to read and write.
b. Knowledgeable or educated in a particular field or fields.
2. Familiar with literature; literary.
3. Well-written; polished: a literate essay.
n.
1. A person who is literate.
2. (used with a pl. verb) People who are literate, considered as a group.

[Middle English litterate, from Latin litterātus, from littera, lītera, letter; see letter.]

lit′er·ate·ly adv.
lit′er·ate·ness n.
Usage Note: For most of its long history in English, literate has meant only "familiar with literature," or more generally, "well-educated, learned." Only since the late 1800s has it also come to refer to the basic ability to read and write. Its antonym illiterate has an equally broad range of meanings: an illiterate person may be incapable of reading a shopping list or uneducated in a particular field. The term functional illiterate is often used to describe a person who can read or write to some degree but below a minimum level required to function in even a limited social situation or job setting. An aliterate person, by contrast, is one who is capable of reading and writing but who has little interest in doing so, whether out of indifference to learning in general or from a preference for seeking information and entertainment by other means. The meanings of the words literacy and illiteracy have been extended from their original connection with reading and literature to any body of knowledge. For example, "geographic illiterates" cannot identify the countries on a map, and "computer illiterates" are unable to operate computers effectively.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

literateness

(ˈlɪtərətnəs)
n
the ability to read and write
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Results show that a one per cent increase in female literateness, female inclusion in workforce rate increases by 0.99 per cent keeping all other variables as constant.
My literateness, for example, may render me functional as a corporate record keeper yet it also inevitably represents a latent internal capacity for critique and creativity.
The second objective of the study is to assess how different country characteristics such as religion, development, corruption, gender inequality and literateness could influence the pay-performance relationship in an economy.