literator


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literator

(ˈlɪtəˌreɪtə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) another word for littérateur
[C18: from Latin, from littera letter]

literator

a scholarly or literary person; one of the literati.
See also: Learning
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References in periodicals archive ?
23) On Habermasian ideas, see Karl Loewenstein, "Obshchestvennost' as Key to Understanding Soviet Writers of the 1950s: 'Moskovskii Literator,' October 1956-March 19571 Journal of Contemporary History 44, 3 (2009): 473-92.
New York: Peter Lang; Potchefstroom: Literator, 2007.
The author acknowledges the valuable feedback from reviewers of this article as well as from the Editor of Literator.
Bizim calismamizda da literator bilgisiyle uyumlu olarak pozisyonlama, postural drenaj, perkusyon ve vibrasyon agirlikli bir program kullanilmis ve benzer olumlu etkiler saptanmistir.
Candice will be the part of a literator or art work and known to visitors as the Lemon Emigrant.
Literator will be joined in the Duty Free by Creachadoir, an exciting four-year-old by former English 2000 Guineas winner King's Best, who was beaten a shorthead in the Group 1 Cathay Pacific Hong Kong Mile at Sha Tin last December.
the South African Journal for Literature and Journal for the Humanities, Standpunte, Literator and the S.
De literator als filosoof: De innerlijke biografie van Jorge Luis Borges.
Alter/Nations (Durban) Current Writing (Durban) The English Academy Review (Johannesburg) English in Africa (Grahamstown) English Studies in Africa (Johannesburg) Imprint (Johannesburg) Journal of Literary Studies (Pretoria) Literator (Potchefstroom) New Coin (Grahamstown) New Contrast (Cape Town) Pretexts (Cape Town) SATJ: South African Theatre Journal (Pretoria) Southern African Review of Books (Cape Town) Theoria (Pietermaritzburg) UNISA English Studies (Pretoria)
At the same time, they are inadequately academic; Petrarch attaints their discursive habits as immature, recalling school books, not adult mastery, "semper scolastice literator, nunquam literatus aut magister" (ICM, III, 928); Petrarch, in contrast, ranks dialectic properly, as via, not terminus, means, not end (ICM, II, 876).