lither


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Related to lither: Luther

lithe

 (līth)
adj. lith·er, lith·est
1. Readily bent; supple: lithe birch branches.
2. Marked by effortless grace: a lithe ballet dancer.

[Middle English, from Old English līthe, flexible, mild.]

lithe′ly adv.
lithe′ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Belgian started just 15 of Solskjaer's 29 matches last term and, amid the preference for lither players, Lukaku could struggle to force his way back into the United team if Inter fail to meet the club's asking price.
"About once a year, the school organised a sports festival and I always did well at short-distance running, long jump and high jump as I was taller, thinner and lither than the average boy.
Use of basic behavioral principles may favor contextually sensitive client work and lither attunement to local community needs and culture.
Suggestions for the first element of the name included Anglo-Saxon "laefer" (gladiolus); Anglo-Saxon "lither" (bad, disagreeable); Old Norse "hlithar (slope); an Old English name, Leofhere; Middle English "livered" (coagulated, clotted).
He looks younger, fresher, lither. He is only 32 but he had always seemed old for his age.
Of the 26 post-Collingwood deliveries, only six went for more than a run on a playing surface kept as big as possible precisely so the younger, lither home batsmen could maximise running betweenthe wickets.
Such figures are everywhere in Yan's work, though they are usually younger, lither, less buttoned-up.
Lither et al25 stated that path of beam passing though the complex roots gives different projections.
The 31-year-old has been called the "Nigel Kennedy of his generation" but their respective recordings are chalk and cheese - Gould is lither, lighter and a lot faster.
The sound is lither, richer and more focused, meaning songs such as Worm Tamer and Heathen Child will quickly get inside your head and work their sinister ways.