litigable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

lit·i·gate

 (lĭt′ĭ-gāt′)
v. lit·i·gat·ed, lit·i·gat·ing, lit·i·gates
v.tr.
To prosecute or defend (a lawsuit or legal action); pursue (a legal case).
v.intr.
To bring a lawsuit or defend against a lawsuit in court.

[Latin lītigāre, lītigāt- : līs, līt-, lawsuit + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots.]

lit′i·ga·ble (-gə-bəl) adj.
lit′i·ga′tion n.
lit′i·ga′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

litigable

(ˈlɪtɪɡəbəl)
adj
(Law) law that may be the subject of litigation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

litigable

adjective
Law. Subject to legal proceedings:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

litigable

adj (Jur) → streitig, strittig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
because the vast majority of litigable claims are never pursued in
difficulty of defining litigable interests once the Court departed from
But legislatures can ensure that similar fact patterns in the future are litigable, which might deter manufacturers from bringing harmful products to the market in the first instance.
(Leong, 2019) As the most infamous perpetrators of sexual harassment and assault impede sufferers from protesting through the defiant utilization of nondisclosure agreements, courts should assume an intolerable role in establishing whether such reconciliations are litigable as a matter of law.
'Through this almost omnipresent surveillance mechanism we have been able to provide credible litigable evidence to Police and LEAs in more than 700 cases and instances.
'Through this almost omnipresent surveillance mechanism, we have been able to provide credible litigable evidence to Police and LEAs in more than 700 cases and instances.
Despite this preference for informal contract governance, the mere presence of an enforceable, litigable contract stabilizes the transaction.
(72) Applying these percentages to the 310 death sentences from 1994, if 7% of those defendants had plausible, litigable intellectual disability claims, that would be about twenty-two defendants; and if about 40% of those twenty-two defendants with plausible intellectual disability claims would have prevailed, that would mean a total of about nine would have been spared.
(20) This quality reveals the functional character of a human right and distinguishes it from dreamy idleness and mundane aspiration that is of no litigable value.
schools, which, ironically, was a litigable claim under the regime of
1988) ("[I]n a section 262 appraisal action the only litigable issue is the determination of the value of the appraisal petitioners' shares on the date of the merger, the only party defendant is the surviving corporation and the only relief available is a judgment against the surviving corporation for the fair value of the dissenters' shares."); Nagy v.
Often, whether a corporation is or is not insolvent for purposes of Delaware law is a litigable issue.