litmus paper

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litmus paper

n.
An unsized white paper impregnated with litmus and used as a pH or acid-base indicator.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lit′mus pa`per


n.
a strip of paper impregnated with litmus, used as a chemical indicator.
[1795–1805]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

litmus paper

Paper impregnated with litmus, a lichen-derived powder that changes color according to the acidity or basicity of a substance it comes into contact with. Litmus paper is thus used to test for acidity or basicity.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.litmus paper - unsized paper treated with litmus for use as an acid-base indicatorlitmus paper - unsized paper treated with litmus for use as an acid-base indicator
litmus, litmus test - a coloring material (obtained from lichens) that turns red in acid solutions and blue in alkaline solutions; used as a very rough acid-base indicator
paper - a material made of cellulose pulp derived mainly from wood or rags or certain grasses
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

litmus paper

nLackmuspapier nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

litmus paper

[ˈlɪtməsˌpeɪpəʳ] n (also) (fig) → cartina al tornasole
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He dropped a piece of litmus paper into an acid, when it changed instantly to red, and on floating it in an alkali it turned as quickly to blue.
"The litmus paper is still the litmus paper," he enunciated in the formal manner of the lecturer.