little magazine


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

little magazine

n.
A noncommercial, usually literary magazine with a limited circulation.

little magazine

n
(Journalism & Publishing) a literary magazine that features experimental or other writing of interest to a limited number of readers

lit′tle magazine′



n.
a magazine, usu. small in format and of limited circulation, that publishes literary works.
[1895–1900]
References in periodicals archive ?
Here is the catalog for the exhibition of highlights from the David McKnight Canadian Little Magazine and Small Press Collection.
I learned the lyrics of their songs from a little magazine called Song Hits, which my classmates passed around stealthily during classes.
House initially approached President William Bennett Bizzell to request a startup budget of $150 for the first two issues of the quarterly that eventually became WLT, his rationale was strikingly modest: "I know our little magazine will be useful in various quarters.
Colin gave me my first gig as a music journalist - writing for a little magazine called Blank, back at the end of the 1990s.
Among the Review staff there was anxiety and uncertainty, including a fear that the University administration might decide that this odd "little magazine" was not worth the trouble and expense to keep it going.
In addition to Burgess's terms, fad magazine and fadazine, this new and unusual print phenomenon went by other names like freak magazine, fadlet, ephemeral, and bibelot, including, occasionally, the term now more commonly used, little magazine. Although these magazines tended, in the period, to be regarded as all of a piece, defined predominantly by their bold appearance and rhetorical posturing, it is helpful to distinguish among three key forms: "aesthetic" little magazines, "periodicals of protest," and "hybrid" magazines.
Out here in the "Real World" the stubby little magazine is good for a single decent burst.
She sent poems to the modernist little magazine, The Egoist, and started corresponding with her Bryn Mawr classmate and fellow poet, H.D.
It opens well with Billy Collins's poem "Literary Magazines." Selections that review swaths of time like Paul Bixler's "Little Magazine, What Now?" are largely lists of names and titles, serving a purpose for those needing a survey, but dry reading for those wanting more.
The editor wrote in the last editorial: "Who knows, maybe Challenge will be remembered kindly, as the little magazine that could." It certainly will.