little office


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little office

n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a series of psalms and prayers similar to the divine office but shorter

lit′tle of′fice


n.
(sometimes caps.) an office similar to but shorter than the divine office, in honor of the Virgin Mary, a saint, etc.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Little Office - a Roman Catholic office honoring the Virgin Mary; similar to but shorter than the Divine Office
office - a religious rite or service prescribed by ecclesiastical authorities; "the offices of the mass"
Church of Rome, Roman Catholic Church, Roman Church, Western Church, Roman Catholic - the Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy
References in classic literature ?
They performed towards him every little office of affection and duty with gentleness, and he rewarded them by his benevolent smiles.
In the warm little office the air became suddenly heavy and the strength went out of her body.
There was a large clock in a little office in the furnace.
"If I were a rose of anywhere, I'd soon wilt in this stuffy little office of inky smells," she answered pleasantly.
She sits in her own little office, and the ladies who are seeking employment wait in an anteroom, and are then shown in one by one, when she consults her ledgers and sees whether she has anything which would suit them.
Flambeau was more interested in the quiet little office below him than in the flamboyant temple above.
Mr Flintwinch had been already rearranging and dusting his own particular little office, as if to do honour to his accession to new dignity.
She was busily engaged in the little offices of the table.
Miller's, one of the greatest pleasures of love--unsuspected by others, she could hold communion with him who had her heart, by the eyes, and a thousand tender and nameless little offices which give interest to affection, and zest to passion.
Uncas acted as attendant to the females, performing all the little offices within his power, with a mixture of dignity and anxious grace, that served to amuse Heyward, who well knew that it was an utter innovation on the Indian customs, which forbid their warriors to descend to any menial employment, especially in favor of their women.
The hungry servant attended Miss Squeers in her own room according to custom, to curl her hair, perform the other little offices of her toilet, and administer as much flattery as she could get up, for the purpose; for Miss Squeers was quite lazy enough (and sufficiently vain and frivolous withal) to have been a fine lady; and it was only the arbitrary distinctions of rank and station which prevented her from being one.
This plan, so vast apparently yet so simple in point of fact, which did away with so many large staffs and so many little offices all equally useless, required for its presentation to the public mind close calculations, precise statistics, and self-evident proof.