little woman


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Related to little woman: Louisa May Alcott

little woman

n
the little woman old-fashioned Brit a facetious term for wife

lit′tle wom′an


n.
usage: This term is usually perceived as insulting.
n.
Usually Offensive. a man's wife: How's the little woman?
[1615–25]
References in classic literature ?
The hats of the men were blue; the little woman's hat was white, and she wore a white gown that hung in pleats from her shoulders.
What could the little woman possibly mean by calling her a sorceress, and saying she had killed the Wicked Witch of the East?
There was a little woman on board, with a little baby; and both little woman and little child were cheerful, good-looking, bright- eyed, and fair to see.
Finally a little woman went by carrying two water jugs.
It was a charming little woman to whom he said it--a sprightly little woman, dressed in perfect taste, who came out of a green velvet bower to attend upon him, from posting up some dainty little books of account which one could hardly suppose to be ruled for the entry of any articles more commercial than kisses, at a dainty little shining desk which looked in itself like a sweetmeat.
Travers was simply a vain little woman of the world, perfectly capable of taking care of herself, and heartless enough to flirt all day long, if she chose, without any risk, so far as she was concerned.
She was a disagreeable little woman, no longer young, who had quarreled with almost every one, owing to a temper which was self-assertive and a disposition to trample upon the rights of others.
(for she had begun to cry); "I would not go back to the old times if I earned twice as much, so that is settled, little woman. Now, cheer up, and I'll be off to the stand."
Snagsby mentions to the 'prentices, "I think my little woman is a-giving it to Guster!"
At last Becky's kindness and attention to the chief of her husband's family were destined to meet with an exceeding great reward, a reward which, though certainly somewhat unsubstantial, the little woman coveted with greater eagerness than more positive benefits.
One student was prettily trying a pair of new gloves upon his little woman's hand.
"That's true; but is this little woman, then, to escape his Eminence?"