liturgical


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Related to liturgical: Liturgical year

li·tur·gi·cal

 (lĭ-tûr′jĭ-kəl) also li·tur·gic (-tûr′jĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or in accordance with liturgy: a book of liturgical forms.
2. Using or used in liturgy.
3. Of or relating to the conventional orientation of churches with the altar toward the east.

li·tur′gi·cal·ly adv.

liturgical

(lɪˈtɜːdʒɪkəl) or

liturgic

adj
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to public worship
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) of or relating to the liturgy
liˈturgically adv

li•tur•gi•cal

(lɪˈtɜr dʒɪ kəl)

also li•tur′gic,



adj.
1. of or pertaining to formal public worship.
2. of or pertaining to the liturgy or Eucharistic service.
3. of or pertaining to liturgics.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin lītūrgic(us) < Late Greek leitourgikós ministering]
li•tur′gi•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.liturgical - of or relating to or in accord with liturgy

liturgical

adjective ceremonial, ritual, solemn, sacramental, formal, eucharistic a liturgical poem traditionally sung on the Sabbath

liturgical

adjective
Of or characterized by ceremony:
Translations
liturginen
liturgisch

liturgical

[lɪˈtɜːdʒɪkəl] ADJlitúrgico

liturgical

[lɪˈtɜːrɪkəl] adjliturgique

liturgical

adjliturgisch

liturgical

[lɪˈtɜːdʒɪkl] adjliturgico/a
References in classic literature ?
Thus far these compositions are called Liturgical Plays, because they formed, in general, a part of the church service (liturgy).
With the exception perhaps of the "Hymn to Ares" (viii), no item in the collection can be regarded as either devotional or liturgical.
Calvin Institute of Christian Worship Liturgical Studies Series.
The Church has established its liturgical praxis on the Letter to the Hebrews.
In an introductory essay, Berger outlines the structure of the book and sketches the arguments for using the concept of migration as an interpretive lens with which to explore historical and contemporary liturgical moments.
WASHINGTON * For those who think the movement to reform Catholic liturgical practices started early in the 20th century, Jesuit Fr.
Liturgical law prescribes that only men can be chosen for that rite.
A context for such a theological language is found in liturgy, where the full content of liturgical performance is not communicated by words alone, but is both formed and enacted ritually, through physical gesture, vocalization, repetition, and an engaged involvement of the person acting in time.
In the first, Pastor #1, in a short column in The Lutheran, (1) as part of his attempt to give a greater emphasis to Pentecost as one of the three great but neglected festival days on the liturgical calendar, described his own practice of creating an actual season of preparation for Pentecost in his parish, which he calls "Prepent," This season of prepararion begins on the Sunday before Pentecost ("Prepent Sunday"), i.
Iversen, Gunilla and Nicolas Bell, eds, Sapientia et Eloquentia: Meaning and Function in Liturgical Poetry, Music, Drama, and Biblical Commentary in the Middle Ages (Disputatio, 11), Turnhout, Brepols, 2009; hardback; pp.
through a reading of the manuscript's use of liturgy, and, as she later argues, possible liturgical uses.
If you want a peek into the current hullabaloo in Roman Catholicism over everything from liturgical translations to where to put the altar, to who washes the Communion dishes after worship, you'll enjoy John Baldovin's Reforming the Liturgy: A Response to the Critics (Liturgical Press, 2009).