liturgy


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liturgy

a form of public worship; ritual; a particular arrangement of religious services
Not to be confused with:
litany – ceremonial form of prayer; prolonged or tedious account; list; enumeration

lit·ur·gy

 (lĭt′ər-jē)
n. pl. lit·ur·gies
1. A prescribed form or set of forms for public religious worship.
2. often Liturgy Christianity The sacrament of the Eucharist.

[Late Latin lītūrgia, from Greek leitourgiā, public service, from leitourgos, public servant, from earlier lēitourgos : lēiton, town hall (from lēos, dialectal variant of lāos, people) + ergon, work; see werg- in Indo-European roots.]

liturgy

(ˈlɪtədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the forms of public services officially prescribed by a Church
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (often capital) chiefly Eastern Churches Also called: Divine Liturgy the Eucharistic celebration
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a particular order or form of public service laid down by a Church
[C16: via Medieval Latin, from Greek leitourgia, from leitourgos minister, from leit- people + ergon work]

lit•ur•gy

(ˈlɪt ər dʒi)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a form of public worship; ritual.
2. a collection of formularies for public worship.
3. a particular arrangement of services.
4. a particular form or type of the Eucharistic service.
5. the service of the Eucharist, esp. this service (Divine Liturgy) in the Eastern Church.
[1550–60; < Late Latin lītūrgia < Late Greek leitourgía Eucharist, Greek lēitourgía public service =lḗït(on) town hall, derivative of lāós, leṓs people (compare lay3) + -ourgia -urgy]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.liturgy - a Christian sacrament commemorating the Last Supper by consecrating bread and wineLiturgy - a Christian sacrament commemorating the Last Supper by consecrating bread and wine
sacrament - a formal religious ceremony conferring a specific grace on those who receive it; the two Protestant ceremonies are baptism and the Lord's Supper; in the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church there are seven traditional rites accepted as instituted by Jesus: baptism and confirmation and Holy Eucharist and penance and holy orders and matrimony and extreme unction
Offertory - the part of the Eucharist when bread and wine are offered to God
Communion, Holy Communion, manduction, sacramental manduction - the act of participating in the celebration of the Eucharist; "the governor took Communion with the rest of the congregation"
2.liturgy - a rite or body of rites prescribed for public worship
religious rite, rite - an established ceremony prescribed by a religion; "the rite of baptism"
Christian liturgy - the Christian worship services

liturgy

noun ceremony, service, ritual, services, celebration, formula, worship, rite, sacrament, form of worship A clergyman read the liturgy from the prayer-book.

liturgy

noun
A formal act or set of acts prescribed by ritual:
Translations
liturgija
liturgia
liturgia
liturgija

liturgy

[ˈlɪtədʒɪ] Nliturgia f

liturgy

[ˈlɪtərdʒi] nliturgie f

liturgy

nLiturgie f

liturgy

[ˈlɪtədʒɪ] nliturgia
References in classic literature ?
Wise and holy men, the fathers of our religion, have expended their labors in clearing what was revealed from the obscurities of language, and the results of their experience and researches have been em bodied in the form of evangelical discipline That this discipline must be salutary, is evident from the view of the weakness of human nature that we have already taken; and that it may be profitable to us, and all who listen to its precepts and its liturgy, may God, in his infinite wisdom, grant!—And now to,” etc.
This was by no means an intended slight of that liturgy to which the divine alluded, but was the habit of a people who owed their very existence, as a distinct nation, to the doctrinal character of their ancestors.
There was no murdering of the noble music, contained in the Bible and the Liturgy, by its recital in a dead monotone, with no more expression than a mechanical talking-doll.
Thus far these compositions are called Liturgical Plays, because they formed, in general, a part of the church service (liturgy).
"Our liturgy," observed Crawford, "has beauties, which not even a careless, slovenly style of reading can destroy; but it has also redundancies and repetitions which require good reading not to be felt.
Two years later Bunyan was again imprisoned because "in contempt of his Majesty's good laws he preached or teached in other manner than according to the Liturgy or practice of the Church of England." But this time his imprisonment lasted only six months.
He thought the custom of baptism more important than its doctrine, and that the religious benefits the peasant drew from the church where his fathers worshipped and the sacred piece of turf where they lay buried were but slightly dependent on a clear understanding of the Liturgy or the sermon.
A CATHEDRAL is to mark International Women's Day by the singing of a liturgy which has not been heard in public for almost 600 years.
The Liturgy of the Nails is the work of Constanza of Castile (1354-1394) who was the Abbess of the Royal Dominican Convent in Madrid.
Sloyan never forgot that "the dimensions of the liturgy are about the shaping of people to serve the world, not just to have a beautiful service or a good time," said Gabe Huck, who worked with Sloyan in the Liturgical Conference of Washington.
Liturgy and Ethics: New Contributions From Reformed Perspectives
The Council Fathers proposed the principle of "organic growth" (2) to describe the historical process of liturgical change and to outline their expectations for how liturgical change would occur following Sacrosanctum concilium's call to revise and update the liturgy. (3) Despite its lack of official definition, this principle has served as a chief measure for determining the legitimacy or illegitimacy of the postconciliar liturgical reforms.