live down


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live 1

 (lĭv)
v. lived, liv·ing, lives
v.intr.
1. To be alive; exist.
2. To continue to be alive: lived through a bad accident.
3. To support oneself; subsist: living on rice and fish; lives on a small inheritance.
4. To reside; dwell: lives on a farm.
5. To conduct one's life in a particular manner: lived frugally.
6. To pursue a positive, satisfying existence; enjoy life: those who truly live.
7. To remain in human memory: an event that lives on in our minds.
v.tr.
1. To spend or pass (one's life).
2. To go through; experience: lived a nightmare.
3. To practice in one's life: live one's beliefs.
Phrasal Verbs:
live down
To overcome or reduce the shame of (a misdeed, for example) over a period of time.
live in
To reside in the place where one is employed: household servants who live in.
live out
To live outside one's place of domestic employment: household servants who live out.
live with
To put up with; resign oneself to: disliked the situation but had to live with it.
Idioms:
live it up Slang
To engage in festive pleasures or extravagances.
live off/on the fat of the land
To enjoy the best of everything; live in comfort or luxury.
live up to
1. To live or act in accordance with: lived up to their parents' ideals.
2. To prove equal to: a new technology that did not live up to our expectations.
3. To carry out; fulfill: lived up to her end of the bargain.

[Middle English liven, from Old English libban, lifian; see leip- in Indo-European roots.]

live 2

 (līv)
adj.
1. Having life; alive: live animals. See Synonyms at living.
2. Of, related to, or occurring during the life of one that is living: a live birth; the live weight of an animal before being slaughtered.
3. Of current interest or relevance: a live topic; still a live option.
4. Informal Full of life, excitement, or activity; lively: a live crowd at the parade; a live party.
5. Glowing; burning: live coals.
6. Not yet exploded but capable of being fired: live ammunition.
7. Electricity Carrying an electric current or energized with electricity: live cables lying dangerously on the ground.
8. Not mined or quarried; in the natural state: live ore.
9.
a. Broadcast while actually being performed; not taped, filmed, or recorded: a live television program.
b. Involving performers or spectators who are physically present: live entertainment; a live audience.
10. Of, relating to, or containing living bacteria or active viruses, sometimes in an attenuated form: live yogurt cultures; a live measles vaccine.
11. Printing Not yet set into type: live copy.
12. Sports In play: a live ball.
adv.
At, during, or from the time of actual occurrence or performance: The landing on the moon was telecast live.

[Short for alive.]

live′ness n.

live down

vb
(tr, adverb) to withstand the effects of (a crime, mistake, etc) by waiting until others forget or forgive it
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.live down - live so as to annul some previous behavior; "You can never live this down!"
live - lead a certain kind of life; live in a certain style; "we had to live frugally after the war"
Translations
يَعيش مع العار حتّى يُنْتَسى
dožít se zapomenutí
leve igennem
kiköszörüli a csorbát
dožiť sa zabudnutia
utancıyla yaşamak

w>live down

vt sep scandal, humiliationhinwegkommen über (+acc), → verwinden; (actively) scandal, mistakeGras wachsen lassen über (+acc); he’ll never live it downdas wird man ihm nie vergessen

live1

(liv) verb
1. to have life; to be alive. This poison is dangerous to everything that lives.
2. to survive. The doctors say he is very ill, but they think he will live.; It was difficult to believe that she had lived through such an experience.
3. to have one's home or dwelling (in a particular place). She lives next to the church.; They went to live in Bristol / in a huge house.
4. to pass (one's life). He lived a life of luxury.; She lives in fear of being attacked.
5. (with by) to make enough money etc to feed and house oneself. He lives by fishing.
-lived adjective
having (a certain type of) life. long-lived.
ˈliving adjective
1. having life; being alive. a living creature; The aim of the project was to discover if there was anything living on Mars.
2. now alive. the greatest living artist.
noun
the money etc needed to feed and house oneself and keep oneself alive. He earns his living driving a taxi; She makes a good living as an author.
ˈliving-room noun
the room of a house etc in which the occupants of the house usually sit during their leisure time.
live-in adjective
living in the same place with a sexual partner without being married to him/her. a live-in partner/boyfriend.
live and let live
to tolerate other people's actions and expect them to tolerate one's own.
live down
to live through the shame of (a foolish act etc) till it is forgotten.
live in/out
to have one's home at, away from, the place where one works. All the hotel staff live in; The nurse chose to live out.
live on
1. to keep oneself alive by eating. He lives on fish and potatoes.
2. to be supported (financially) by. He lives on $40 a week.
live up to
to behave in a manner worthy of. He found it difficult to live up to his reputation as a hero.
(with)in living memory
within a period recent enough to be remembered by someone still alive. It was the worst harvest in living memory.
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick, 'you don't really mean to say that human beings live down in those wretched dungeons?
Who knows all its awful perhapses,--those shudderings and tremblings, which it can no more live down than it can outlive its own eternity
With Scotch patience and pluck he resolved to live down his reputation and work his way into the legal field yet.
Of course, I've had my troubles, but one can live down troubles.
I recalled numerous acts of my past life which I should have been glad to have had a few more years to live down.
What a man did in those rough cruel days might be forgotten and forgiven but the sins of his mother or his grandfather in not being of noble blood, no matter howsoever wickedly attained, he might never overcome or live down.
My people live down in the country, and I haven't many pals.
I've made up my mind to chuck my work and live down here.
A young man with brains can always do something out there, and you can live down this little mischance.
All these--the sort of people that lived in these houses, and all those damn little clerks that used to live down that way--they'd be no good.