lived


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live 1

 (lĭv)
v. lived, liv·ing, lives
v.intr.
1. To be alive; exist.
2. To continue to be alive: lived through a bad accident.
3. To support oneself; subsist: living on rice and fish; lives on a small inheritance.
4. To reside; dwell: lives on a farm.
5. To conduct one's life in a particular manner: lived frugally.
6. To pursue a positive, satisfying existence; enjoy life: those who truly live.
7. To remain in human memory: an event that lives on in our minds.
v.tr.
1. To spend or pass (one's life).
2. To go through; experience: lived a nightmare.
3. To practice in one's life: live one's beliefs.
Phrasal Verbs:
live down
To overcome or reduce the shame of (a misdeed, for example) over a period of time.
live in
To reside in the place where one is employed: household servants who live in.
live out
To live outside one's place of domestic employment: household servants who live out.
live with
To put up with; resign oneself to: disliked the situation but had to live with it.
Idioms:
live it up Slang
To engage in festive pleasures or extravagances.
live off/on the fat of the land
To enjoy the best of everything; live in comfort or luxury.
live up to
1. To live or act in accordance with: lived up to their parents' ideals.
2. To prove equal to: a new technology that did not live up to our expectations.
3. To carry out; fulfill: lived up to her end of the bargain.

[Middle English liven, from Old English libban, lifian; see leip- in Indo-European roots.]

live 2

 (līv)
adj.
1. Having life; alive: live animals. See Synonyms at living.
2. Of, related to, or occurring during the life of one that is living: a live birth; the live weight of an animal before being slaughtered.
3. Of current interest or relevance: a live topic; still a live option.
4. Informal Full of life, excitement, or activity; lively: a live crowd at the parade; a live party.
5. Glowing; burning: live coals.
6. Not yet exploded but capable of being fired: live ammunition.
7. Electricity Carrying an electric current or energized with electricity: live cables lying dangerously on the ground.
8. Not mined or quarried; in the natural state: live ore.
9.
a. Broadcast while actually being performed; not taped, filmed, or recorded: a live television program.
b. Involving performers or spectators who are physically present: live entertainment; a live audience.
10. Of, relating to, or containing living bacteria or active viruses, sometimes in an attenuated form: live yogurt cultures; a live measles vaccine.
11. Printing Not yet set into type: live copy.
12. Sports In play: a live ball.
adv.
At, during, or from the time of actual occurrence or performance: The landing on the moon was telecast live.

[Short for alive.]

live′ness n.

lived

(laɪvd, lɪvd)

adj.
having life, a life, or lives, as specified (usu. in combination): long-lived.
[1350–1400]
pron: The adjective lived is not derived from the verb live (lɪv) but from the noun life (laɪf) to which the suffix -ed3 has been added. The original pronunciation, therefore, retains the vowel (ī) of life. Since the f of life changes to v when -ed is added, as when leaf becomes leaved, this lived is identical in spelling to the past and past participle lived, which is pronounced (lɪvd) Conflation of the two words has led to the increasing use of the latter pronunciation for the adjective in such combinations as long-lived and short-lived. Both pronunciations (laɪvd, lɪvd) are now considered standard.
References in classic literature ?
Countless men have passed through the long sickness and lived to tell of it and deliberately to forget it to the end of their days.
Bartnyansky, who must spend at least fifty thousand to judge by the style he lived in, had made an interesting comment the day before on that subject.
The two lived alone in a three-roomed cabin, almost within the shadow of the ruin.
And Unc never spoke any more words than he was obliged to, so his little nephew, who lived alone with him, had learned to understand a great deal from one word.
When I wrote the following pages, or rather the bulk of them, I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond, in Concord, Massachusetts, and earned my living by the labor of my hands only.
Some domestic serfs Pierre met, in reply to inquiries as to where the prince lived, pointed out a small newly built lodge close to the pond.
So they lived for the present, in expectation of another appointment.