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live 1

v. lived, liv·ing, lives
1. To be alive; exist.
2. To continue to be alive: lived through a bad accident.
3. To support oneself; subsist: living on rice and fish; lives on a small inheritance.
4. To reside; dwell: lives on a farm.
5. To conduct one's life in a particular manner: lived frugally.
6. To pursue a positive, satisfying existence; enjoy life: those who truly live.
7. To remain in human memory: an event that lives on in our minds.
1. To spend or pass (one's life).
2. To go through; experience: lived a nightmare.
3. To practice in one's life: live one's beliefs.
Phrasal Verbs:
live down
To overcome or reduce the shame of (a misdeed, for example) over a period of time.
live in
To reside in the place where one is employed: household servants who live in.
live out
To live outside one's place of domestic employment: household servants who live out.
live with
To put up with; resign oneself to: disliked the situation but had to live with it.
live it up Slang
To engage in festive pleasures or extravagances.
live off/on the fat of the land
To enjoy the best of everything; live in comfort or luxury.
live up to
1. To live or act in accordance with: lived up to their parents' ideals.
2. To prove equal to: a new technology that did not live up to our expectations.
3. To carry out; fulfill: lived up to her end of the bargain.

[Middle English liven, from Old English libban, lifian; see leip- in Indo-European roots.]

live 2

1. Having life; alive: live animals. See Synonyms at living.
2. Of, related to, or occurring during the life of one that is living: a live birth; the live weight of an animal before being slaughtered.
3. Of current interest or relevance: a live topic; still a live option.
4. Informal Full of life, excitement, or activity; lively: a live crowd at the parade; a live party.
5. Glowing; burning: live coals.
6. Not yet exploded but capable of being fired: live ammunition.
7. Electricity Carrying an electric current or energized with electricity: live cables lying dangerously on the ground.
8. Not mined or quarried; in the natural state: live ore.
a. Broadcast while actually being performed; not taped, filmed, or recorded: a live television program.
b. Involving performers or spectators who are physically present: live entertainment; a live audience.
10. Of, relating to, or containing living bacteria or active viruses, sometimes in an attenuated form: live yogurt cultures; a live measles vaccine.
11. Printing Not yet set into type: live copy.
12. Sports In play: a live ball.
At, during, or from the time of actual occurrence or performance: The landing on the moon was telecast live.

[Short for alive.]

live′ness n.


(laɪvd, lɪvd)

having life, a life, or lives, as specified (usu. in combination): long-lived.
pron: The adjective lived is not derived from the verb live (lɪv) but from the noun life (laɪf) to which the suffix -ed3 has been added. The original pronunciation, therefore, retains the vowel (ī) of life. Since the f of life changes to v when -ed is added, as when leaf becomes leaved, this lived is identical in spelling to the past and past participle lived, which is pronounced (lɪvd) Conflation of the two words has led to the increasing use of the latter pronunciation for the adjective in such combinations as long-lived and short-lived. Both pronunciations (laɪvd, lɪvd) are now considered standard.
References in classic literature ?
She knew it very well, for it was that beautiful old story of the best life ever lived, and Jo felt that it was a true guidebook for any pilgrim going on a long journey.
The windows of the house in which he lived were high and he wanted to look at the trees when he awoke in the morning.
This story has to do with the hidden city, and tells of the ancient civilization of those who lived in the Copan valley thousands of years ago.
I was ten years old then; I had lost both my father and mother within a year, and my Virginia relatives were sending me out to my grandparents, who lived in Nebraska.
The two lived alone in a three-roomed cabin, almost within the shadow of the ruin.
He lived in a little town called, Puddleby- on-the-Marsh.
The young couple lived happily together till winter came, when the Flower Queen's daughter departed and went home to her mother.
A little way off was a small brook, rushing and sparkling along between green banks, and murmuring in a voice very grateful to a little girl who had lived so long on the dry, gray prairies.
There was once a fisherman who lived with his wife in a pigsty, close by the seaside.
I asked one or two natives if they knew anything about him, and I discovered that he lived not more than five kilometres from where I was.
Some domestic serfs Pierre met, in reply to inquiries as to where the prince lived, pointed out a small newly built lodge close to the pond.
Dorothy Gale lived on a farm in Kansas, with her Aunt Em and her Uncle Henry.