livelihood

(redirected from livelihoods)
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live·li·hood

 (līv′lē-ho͝od′)
n.
Means of support; subsistence.

[Middle English livelyhed, alteration (influenced by liflihed, liveliness, energy, vigor) of livelode, from Old English līflād : līf, life; see life + lād, course; see leit- in Indo-European roots.]

livelihood

(ˈlaɪvlɪˌhʊd)
n
occupation or employment
Also called (literary): livelod or livelood

live•li•hood

(ˈlaɪv liˌhʊd)

n.
a means of supporting one's existence, esp. financially or vocationally; living.
[before 1000; earlier liveliod, livelihod, alter. of Middle English livelod, Old English līflād conduct of life, way of life]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.livelihood - the financial means whereby one liveslivelihood - the financial means whereby one lives; "each child was expected to pay for their keep"; "he applied to the state for support"; "he could no longer earn his own livelihood"
resource - available source of wealth; a new or reserve supply that can be drawn upon when needed
amenities, comforts, conveniences, creature comforts - things that make you comfortable and at ease; "all the comforts of home"
maintenance - means of maintenance of a family or group
meal ticket - a source of income or livelihood
subsistence - minimal (or marginal) resources for subsisting; "social security provided only a bare subsistence"

livelihood

noun occupation, work, employment, means, living, job, maintenance, subsistence, bread and butter (informal), sustenance, (means of) support, (source of) income fishermen who depend on the seas for their livelihood.

livelihood

noun
Translations
مَوْرِد رِزْق
živobytí
levebrød
lífsviîurværi
gyvenimo šaltinis
iztikas līdzekļi

livelihood

[ˈlaɪvlɪhʊd] Nsustento m
rice is their livelihoodel arroz es su único sustento
to earn a or one's livelihoodganarse la vida or el sustento

livelihood

[ˈlaɪvlihʊd] nmoyens mpl d'existence
to depend on sth for one's livelihood → dépendre de qch pour sa subsistance
fishermen who depend on the sea for their livelihood → des pêcheurs qui dépendent de la mer pour leur subsistance

livelihood

nLebensunterhalt m; fishing is their livelihoodsie verdienen ihren Lebensunterhalt mit Fischfang; to earn a livelihoodsich (dat)seinen Lebensunterhalt verdienen; they earned a livelihood from farmingsie lebten von der Landwirtschaft

livelihood

[ˈlaɪvlɪˌhʊd] nmezzi mpl di sostentamento
to earn one's livelihood → guadagnarsi da vivere

livelihood

(ˈlaivlihud) noun
a means of living, especially of earning enough money to feed oneself etc.

livelihood

n. vida; existencia; subsistencia.
References in classic literature ?
Being thus deprived of the means of his livelihood, he sat down on the bank and lamented his hard fate.
Nor did he know that the TRANSCONTINENTAL was the sole livelihood of the editor and the business manager, and that they could wring their livelihood out of it only by moving to escape paying rent and by never paying any bill they could evade.
In a republic, where fortunes are not affluent, and pensions not expedient, the dismission of men from stations in which they have served their country long and usefully, on which they depend for subsistence, and from which it will be too late to resort to any other occupation for a livelihood, ought to have some better apology to humanity than is to be found in the imaginary danger of a superannuated bench.
But the writer of the article in question goes on to point out, with insight and justice, that for a great number of people (20,000, I think he says) it is a means of livelihood - that it is, in his own words, an industry.
And whatever be your lot, work is best for you, if you turn your misguided mind away from other men's property to your work and attend to your livelihood as I bid you.
Noah Claypole: receiving a free pardon from the Crown in consequence of being admitted approver against Fagin: and considering his profession not altogether as safe a one as he could wish: was, for some little time, at a loss for the means of a livelihood, not burdened with too much work.
Madame Granson, widow of a lieutenant-colonel of artillery killed at Jena, possessed, as her whole means of livelihood, a meagre pension of nine hundred francs a year, and three hundred francs from property of her own, plus a son whose support and education had eaten up all her savings.
Some were undone by lawsuits; others spent all they had in drinking, whoring, and gaming; others fled for treason; many for murder, theft, poisoning, robbery, perjury, forgery, coining false money, for committing rapes, or sodomy; for flying from their colours, or deserting to the enemy; and most of them had broken prison; none of these durst return to their native countries, for fear of being hanged, or of starving in a jail; and therefore they were under the necessity of seeking a livelihood in other places.
We earn our livelihood in America today in peaceful competition with people all across the Earth.
There is nothing so degrading as the constant anxiety about one's means of livelihood.
But it's no matter whether they get married or not: we can devise a thousand honest ways of making a livelihood.
I threaten mamma sometimes that I'll run away, and disgrace the family by earning my own livelihood, if she torments me any more; and then that frightens her a little.