acinus

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Related to liver acinus: portal lobule

ac·i·nus

 (ăs′ə-nəs)
n. pl. ac·i·ni (-nī′)
One of the small saclike dilations composing a compound gland.

[Latin, berry.]

a·cin′ic (ə-sĭn′ĭk), ac′i·nous adj.

acinus

(ˈæsɪnəs)
n, pl -ni (-ˌnaɪ)
1. (Anatomy) anatomy any of the terminal saclike portions of a compound gland
2. (Botany) botany any of the small drupes that make up the fruit of the blackberry, raspberry, etc
3. botany obsolete a collection of berries, such as a bunch of grapes
[C18: New Latin, from Latin: grape, berry]
acinic, ˈacinous, ˈacinose adj

ac•i•nus

(ˈæs ə nəs)

n., pl. -ni (-ˌnaɪ)
1. a small, rounded form, as a lobule, sac, seed, or berry.
2. the smallest secreting portion of a gland.
[1725–35; < Latin: grape, berry, seed of a berry]
ac′i•nar (-nər, -ˌnɑr) a•cin•ic (əˈsɪn ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.acinus - one of the small drupes making up an aggregate or multiple fruit like a blackberryacinus - one of the small drupes making up an aggregate or multiple fruit like a blackberry
drupelet - a small part of an aggregate fruit that resembles a drupe
2.acinus - one of the small sacs or saclike dilations in a compound glandacinus - one of the small sacs or saclike dilations in a compound gland
gland, secreter, secretor, secretory organ - any of various organs that synthesize substances needed by the body and release it through ducts or directly into the bloodstream
sac - a structure resembling a bag in an animal
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Injury to the sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes in zone 3 of the liver acinus appears to be a critical process in the development of SOS.
Each liver acinus is divided into three concentric zones of hepatocytes radiating from a portal triad and terminating at one or more adjacent terminal hepatic venules.
Complementary distribution of carbamoylphosphate synthetase (ammonia) and glutamine synthetase in rat liver acinus is regulated at a pretranslational level.