living will


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Related to living will: living trust, Durable power of attorney

living will

n.
A document in which the signer states his or her wishes regarding medical treatment that sustains or prolongs life, especially by invasive or extraordinary means, for use if the signer becomes mentally incompetent or unable to communicate.

living will

n
(Law) a document stating that if its author becomes terminally ill, his or her life should not be prolonged by artificial means, such as a life-support machine

liv′ing will′


n.
a document in which a person stipulates that no extraordinary measures are to be used to prolong his or her life in the event of a terminal illness.
[1965–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.living will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illnessliving will - a document written by someone still legally capable requesting that he should be allowed to die if subsequently severely disabled or suffering terminal illness; "after he discovered he had AIDS he drew up a living will"
legal document, legal instrument, official document, instrument - (law) a document that states some contractual relationship or grants some right
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations

liv·ing will

n. testamento hecho por una persona en completo estado de salud en el que dispone que en caso de peligro de muerte no se use ningún medio artificial para prolongarle la vida.

living will

n testamento vital
References in periodicals archive ?
A living will sets out a patient's wishes regarding how they want to be treated if they are seriously ill.
One document, typically called a living will, spelled out Morrison's preferences for life-sustaining medical treatment, such as ventilators and feeding tubes.
The existence of a living will that sets out a credible path to resolving the firm without public support makes it more plausible that regulators would actually opt for bankruptcy rather than feeling forced to mount a rescue.
Barton notes that a living will also frees your loved ones from the pressure of having to make critical medical care decisions for you while they are under stress or in emotional turmoil.
Like many advanced directives, the WV living will requires patients to make the same broad care decisions for a terminal condition or a persistent vegetative state.
For those in the early stages of a serious illness, the progression of which is known, a living will can provide vital help and advice to loved ones at a time when they need it the most.
Given today's societal demands, there is a clear need for patients to create a living will, which is a document designed to enforce a patient's rights to respect for his or her personality, human dignity, privacy and personal autonomy, as well as confidentiality in the handling of his or her clinical history (1).
The living will requirement could actually yield similar results to restoring Glass-Steagall without actual re-enactment of the Depression-era la ws se parating commercial banking from investment banking, former FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair told Reuters TV earlier this month.
I'm a fit and able man of 48 and I'm thinking about making a living will to set out treatments I don't want if I become seriously ill.
(7) This section requires certain large financial institutions to regularly report "the plan of such company for rapid and orderly resolution in the event of material financial distress or failure." (8) These resolution plans became popularly known as "living wills." (9) Many financial institutions and their advocates agreed that living wills were a prudential measure to avoid the resolution problems of the 2008 crisis, (10) But when the FDIC announced a proposed rule for the living will requirements on April 22, 2011, observers voiced serious concerns over the proposed regulations.
Medical Directives that contain elements of both the health care power of attorney and the living will, by allowing individuals to state their wishes regarding various types of specific medical treatments, appoint a proxy, and record wishes regarding organ donation (see www.medicaldirective.org).