livingness

livingness

(ˈlɪvɪŋnəs)
n
the condition or quality of having life and being alive
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(136) For, our rational powers, to express the lifelikeness of Time and its pure duration by signs, such as is wrong because this symbol merely statically depicts the livingness of Time and pure duration, which misrepresents the dynamic quality of temporality.
According to the process paradigm, being does not repose in an originary source antecedent to any event; rather, it constitutes the very act of being--the livingness of living, of existing--in the present moment as a new one emergent from an antecedent many.
And inside my head it was like my laughter had become a flag, a waving flag for a nation--and the nation wasn't about nationality but about pure livingness. How it was good to be alive no matter what and that for as long as laughing lasted the possibility of goodness couldn't be denied.
[75] studied the influence of several kinetic parameters and reaction steps on the livingness and controlled character of a generic NMP.
19f.)." (32) The Spirit of God is "the livingness of life in the inhaling and exhaling of air; mach [Spirit]" (33)--it is the very life force that permeates and sustains creation.
The livingness of these macromolecular systems was confirmed, among the others, using the obtained PMMA-Br as ATRP macroinitiator for the synthesis of the desired block copolymers.
Mishler gives ample evidence of the "livingness" of the tale as it has emerged from time immemorial (when loons could speak with people) into popular media: films, compact discs, radio broadcasts, a ballet, a composition of chamber music, theatrical performances, and various literary adaptations (119-20).
The animal should be examined carefully to diagnose the cause of dystocia, type of presentation, position, posture and livingness of fetus.
We are therefore also asked to imagine those lives that are so inconceivable, so unworthy of documentation, so radically outside our archives, that they are merely psychic impressions of life and livingness: lies and truths and new stories and familiar scars that, because they are unindexed, cannot provide us with the analytical tools to analytically take black life away.
Roger Sale, in his 1968 essay "Tolkien and Frodo Baggins," perceives that Frodo, "[i]n his scarred and beautiful relationship with Smeagol [...] is saved from the worst ravages of the Ring because he binds himself to others rather than to love of power[...]" This, says Sale, is the distinctly modern form of heroism that moves Tolkien more than any event on the battlefields of the War of the Ring: "We see, without in the least needing to make the seeing into a formulation, what the heroism of our time is and can be: lonely, lost, scared, loving, willing, and compassionate--to bind oneself to the otherness of others by recognizing our common livingness" (287-88).
Such an interest has emerged as part of ongoing and "enduring preoccupations with the processes and excesses of 'livingness' in a more-than-human world" (Whatmore, 2006, page 604).
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