loath


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loath

also loth  (lōth, lōth)
adj.
Unwilling or reluctant; disinclined: I am loath to go on such short notice.

[Middle English loth, displeasing, loath, from Old English lāth, hateful, loathsome.]

loath

(ləʊθ) or

loth

adj
1. (usually foll by to) reluctant or unwilling
2. nothing loath willing
[Old English lāth (in the sense: hostile); related to Old Norse leithr]
ˈloathness, ˈlothness n

loath

or loth

(loʊθ, loʊð)

adj.
unwilling; reluctant: to be loath to admit a mistake.
[before 900; Middle English loth, lath, Old English lāth hostile, hateful, c. Old Saxon lēth, Old High German leid, Old Norse leithr]
loath′ness, n.
syn: See reluctant.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.loath - unwillingness to do something contrary to your custom; "a reluctant smile"; "loath to admit a mistake"
unwilling - not disposed or inclined toward; "an unwilling assistant"; "unwilling to face facts"
2.loath - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposedloath - (usually followed by `to') strongly opposed; "antipathetic to new ideas"; "averse to taking risks"; "loath to go on such short notice"; "clearly indisposed to grant their request"
disinclined - unwilling because of mild dislike or disapproval; "disinclined to say anything to anybody"

loath

loth
adjective unwilling, against, opposed, counter, resisting, reluctant, backward, averse, disinclined, indisposed She is loath to give up her hard-earned liberty.
willing, keen, anxious, eager, enthusiastic, avid, desirous

loath

also loth
adjective
Not inclined or willing to do or undertake:
Translations

loath

[ləʊθ] ADJ to be loath to do sthestar poco dispuesto a hacer algo, ser reacio a hacer algo
to be loath for sb to do sthno querer en absoluto que algn haga algo
nothing loathde buena gana

loath

[ˈləʊθ] adj
to be loath to do sth → répugner à faire qch

loath

, loth
adj to be loath to do somethingetw ungern tun; loath as I am to leaveso ungern ich auch gehe; he was loath for us to goer ließ uns ungern gehen; nothing loath (old)bereitwillig(st)

loath

[ləʊθ] adj to be loath to do sthessere riluttante or restio/a a fare qc
References in classic literature ?
I must own that we found it far prettier than anything we had known in Southern Ohio, which we were so fond of and so loath to leave, and as I look back it still seems to me one of the prettiest little places I have ever known, with its white wooden houses, glimmering in the dark of its elms and maples, and their silent gardens beside each, and the silent, grass- bordered, sandy streets between them.
It seemed our eyes must meet in a great understanding, and yet, loath, they struggled away and did not meet.
They moved us into town, put down the carpets in our new house, made shelves and cupboards for grandmother's kitchen, and seemed loath to leave us.
He had already had proofs that several of them were disaffected to the enterprise, and loath to cross the mountains.
Yet now, that his time had come, I was loath to see him go.
Perhaps he was already known as a poet and a good story-teller whom the King was loath to lose.
When they drew near he motioned them away with an expressive action of the foot, loath to disturb the fixed lines of his countenance, his arms, or his rigid shoulders.
The morning's ride had made him hungry; and he was nothing loath when they bade him come to the dinner.
But Adam, being of a calm and cautious character, was loath to relinquish the advantages which a single man possesses for raising himself in the world.
In the present instance, these wild blades were anxious to regain their belles; nor were the latter loath once more to come under their protection.
He was loath to leave his brother alone all day long, and he was afraid his brother would laugh at him about it.
I was something impatient, as I have observed, to have the use of my boat, though very loath to run any more hazards; and therefore sometimes I sat contriving ways to get her about the island, and at other times I sat myself down contented enough without her.