lobotomy

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lo·bot·o·my

 (lə-bŏt′ə-mē, lō-)
n. pl. lo·bot·o·mies
Surgical incision into the frontal lobe of the brain to sever one or more nerve tracts, a technique formerly used to treat certain mental disorders but now rarely performed.

[lobe + -tomy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lobotomy

(ləʊˈbɒtəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
1. (Surgery) a surgical incision into a lobe of any organ
2. (Surgery) Also called: prefrontal leucotomy a surgical interruption of one or more nerve tracts in the frontal lobe of the brain: used in the treatment of intractable mental disorders
[C20: from lobe + -tomy]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lo•bot•o•my

(ləˈbɒt ə mi, loʊ-)

n., pl. -mies.
a surgical incision into or across a lobe, esp. the prefrontal lobe, of the brain to sever nerves for the purpose of relieving a mental disorder or treating psychotic behavior.
[1935–40; lobe + -o- + -tomy]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lobotomy

surgical severing of certain nerve fibers in the frontal lobe of the brain, once commonly performed to treat intractable depression. Also called prefrontal lobotomy.
See also: Brain
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

lobotomy

Surgery to remove part of the brain.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lobotomy - surgical interruption of nerve tracts to and from the frontal lobe of the brain; often results in marked cognitive and personality changes
psychosurgery - brain surgery on human patients intended to relieve severe and otherwise intractable mental or behavioral problems
transorbital lobotomy - a method of performing prefrontal lobotomy in which the surgical knife is inserted above the eyeball and moved to cut brain fibers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lobotomy

[ləʊˈbɒtəmɪ] Nlobotomía f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lobotomy

[ləˈbɒtəmi] nlobotomie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lobotomy

n (Med) → Lobotomie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lobotomy

[ləʊˈbɒtəmɪ] n (Med) → lobotomia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lo·bot·o·my

n. obotomía, incisión de un lóbulo cerebral con el fin de aliviar ciertos trastornos mentales.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

lobotomy

n (pl -mies) lobotomía
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although medicated and tortured (in graphic detail), the "patients" stick together to try to avoid random lobotomies and disappearances.
After that grisly, gruesome and potty plot - all those lobotomies and murders - Marcella was hypnotised, which caused her even more grief as she was taken back to the death of her baby.
Should full frontal lobotomies be required of Silicon Valley engineers looking to change jobs?
Electric shock treatment was used as well as lobotomies. The lobotomy was performed by a local GP or surgeon and one patient is known to have died.
The participants in the congress included the European neuroscientists Antonio Egas Moniz, Almeida Lima and the American Walter Freeman, who introduced what they saw and experienced into medical practice, thus having a major influence on the appearance of frontal lobotomies and leucotomies in the surgical treatment of mental illnesses (2, 4).
Freeman performed his (http://projects.wsj.com/lobotomyfiles/?ch=two) last two icepick lobotomies in 1967.
In White Matter, Sternburg compares her own combination of ignorance and knowledge that both her aunt and her uncle had had prefrontal lobotomies to other children's that a grandfather had fought in a war.
She underwent one of America's first lobotomies; her father Joseph Kennedy was assured that the operation would normalize Rosie's life, but instead it dramatically worsened her condition.
Pre-frontal lobotomies, that saw part of the brain purposely damaged by severing nerves, were said to be widespread at the hospital.
The bookends with a discussion of lobotomies, which were recently considered the height of psychiatric science, raising the question of which current medical practices will one day seem quaint--or barbaric.
They learned this through observing people with partial lobotomies. These were persons who had, accidentally or surgically, lost one frontal lobe of their brain.