locum tenens

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lo·cum te·nens

 (lō′kəm′ tē′nĕnz′, tĕn′ənz)
n. pl. locum te·nen·tes (tə-nĕn′tēz)
A person, especially a physician or cleric, who substitutes temporarily for another.

[Medieval Latin locum tenēns : Latin locum, accusative of locus, place + Latin tenēns, present participle of tenēre, to hold.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

locum tenens

(ˈləʊkəm ˈtiːnɛnz)
n, pl locum tenentes (təˈnɛntiːz)
chiefly Brit a person who stands in temporarily for another member of the same profession, esp for a physician, chemist, or clergyman. Often shortened to: locum
[C17: Medieval Latin: (someone) holding the place (of another)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lo•cum te•nens

(ˈloʊ kəm ˈti nɛnz, ˈtɛn ɪnz)

n., pl. locum te•nen•tes (təˈnɛn tiz)
a temporary substitute, esp. for a doctor or member of the clergy.
Also called, esp. Brit., locum.
[1635–45; < Medieval Latin locum tenēns literally, (one) holding the place]
lo′cum-te′nen•cy, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

locum tenens

A Latin phrase meaning place-holding, used to mean a person who acts as a temporary substitute for someone else, especially a physician.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locum tenens - someone (physician or clergyman) who substitutes temporarily for another member of the same profession
backup man, fill-in, reliever, stand-in, backup, substitute, relief - someone who takes the place of another (as when things get dangerous or difficult); "the star had a stand-in for dangerous scenes"; "we need extra employees for summer fill-ins"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of the time, locum tenentes don't know where their next assignment will take them, but that's part of the fun.
And DRGs represent a new opportunity for locum tenentes: Clinics and hospitals may want to expand, yet hesitate because of uncertainty over the impact of prospective payment.
33) that archdeacons were frequently absentees at this period (and earlier) and that their officials were accustomed to act as locum tenentes. Hence the adage Qui facit per alium facit per se.