locus


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Related to locus: locust

lo·cus

 (lō′kəs)
n. pl. lo·ci (-sī′, -kē, -kī′)
1. A locality; a place.
2. A center or focus of great activity or intense concentration: "the cunning exploitation of loci of power; the insulation from normal American society" (Clifton Fadiman).
3. Mathematics The set or configuration of all points whose coordinates satisfy a single equation or one or more algebraic conditions.
4. The position that a given gene or genetic marker occupies on a chromosome.

[Latin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

locus

(ˈləʊkəs)
n, pl loci (ˈləʊsaɪ)
1. (Law) (in many legal phrases) a place or area, esp the place where something occurred
2. (Mathematics) maths a set of points whose location satisfies or is determined by one or more specified conditions: the locus of points equidistant from a given point is a circle.
3. (Genetics) genetics the position of a particular gene on a chromosome
[C18: Latin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lo•cus

(ˈloʊ kəs)

n., pl. -ci (-saɪ, -ki, -kaɪ)
1. a place; locality.
2. a center or source, as of activities or power: locus of control.
3. Math. the set of all points, lines, or surfaces that satisfy a given requirement.
4. the position of a gene on a chromosome.
[1525–35; < Latin; Old Latin stlocus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.locus - the scene of any event or action (especially the place of a meeting)locus - the scene of any event or action (especially the place of a meeting)
scene - the place where some action occurs; "the police returned to the scene of the crime"
2.locus - the specific site of a particular gene on its chromosome
site, situation - physical position in relation to the surroundings; "the sites are determined by highly specific sequences of nucleotides"
3.locus - the set of all points or lines that satisfy or are determined by specific conditions; "the locus of points equidistant from a given point is a circle"
set - (mathematics) an abstract collection of numbers or symbols; "the set of prime numbers is infinite"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

locus

noun
1. The place where a person or thing is located:
2. A particular portion of space chosen for something:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

locus

[ˈləʊkəs] N (loci (pl)) → punto m, sitio m (Math) → lugar m (geométrico)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

locus

n pl <loci> → geometrischer Ort
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

locus

[ˈləʊkəs] n (loci (pl)) [ˈləʊsaɪ] (Math) → luogo geometrico
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lo·cus

1. n. lugar, sitio;
2. localización de un gen en el cromosoma.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
You know what Servius saith: ' Nullus enim locus sine genio est ,--for there is no place that hath not its spirit.'"
I said to myself that this was a sign that Juliana and her niece(disenchanting idea!) were untidy persons, with a low Italian standard; but I afterward recognized that a lodger who had forced an entrance had no locus standi as a critic.
"This is no locus docendi, it is true," began the clerical gentleman; "yet I beg you earnestly to let us profit by your learning.
And on this agreement they started--Tom, satisfied with having made his confession, and not sorry to have a locus penitentiae, and not to be deprived altogether of the use of his old and faithful friend.
Rucastle, so I think, Watson, that we had best escort Miss Hunter back to Winchester, as it seems to me that our locus standi now is rather a questionable one."
In the MG, in contrast, age explained the locus of control, both when inserted as a first step (15.5%), and when included as a second step (13.9%), while attachment did not present a significant weight in the explaining the locus of control.
Locus of control refers to the extent to which people attribute control over events to themselves or to external environmental factors [23].
Paul Zorner, Locus AG's CEO and a leading industry expert, will show the immediate and unprecedented benefits of using Rhizolizer, the company's line oforganic microbial soil treatments or "probiotics," along with new data verified by independent labs.
Locus Telecommunications and its 200 employees along with its valued distributors will continue operating as they are today.
In the past, studies have been done to develop a relationship between positive health behavior and health locus of control18.
Researchers examined the 'locus of control' by using responses from questionnaires completed by over 1,600 pregnant women who took part in the Children of the 90s study.