locutory


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locutory

(ˈlɒkjʊtərɪ)
n, pl -tories
a room intended for conversation, particularly in a monastery
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

locutory

[ˈlɒkjʊtərɪ] Nlocutorio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
26-27, 54-55, 73, 85, 99-102, 150-51), of the terms locutory', 'allocutory', and 'delocutoryi, which refer to different personal spheres.
According to Johnson (2006) in his study agreeing turn-taking in conversation, that is, to be on agreement and ready to act as obviously suggested by a locutory speech; speech act level, dealing with interpretation of speech act where context is determinant to get the meaning or intention; and discourse level where more complex topics and more conversation participants are involved but need not to act as the result of saying or expressing agreement.
Approximately three by eight metres of unused space now existed between the south wall of the Locutory and the newly-created glass north wall of the Visitor Centre.
Significantly, the shift away from the absolute locutory mimesis of the chameleonic "assimilist" (160) to verbal allotropy parallels the switch out of the mode of invisibility and facelessness into a position of assumed visibility and social presence.