locutory


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locutory

(ˈlɒkjʊtərɪ)
n, pl -tories
a room intended for conversation, particularly in a monastery
Translations

locutory

[ˈlɒkjʊtərɪ] Nlocutorio m
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Johnson (2006) in his study agreeing turn-taking in conversation, that is, to be on agreement and ready to act as obviously suggested by a locutory speech; speech act level, dealing with interpretation of speech act where context is determinant to get the meaning or intention; and discourse level where more complex topics and more conversation participants are involved but need not to act as the result of saying or expressing agreement.
Approximately three by eight metres of unused space now existed between the south wall of the Locutory and the newly-created glass north wall of the Visitor Centre.
Significantly, the shift away from the absolute locutory mimesis of the chameleonic "assimilist" (160) to verbal allotropy parallels the switch out of the mode of invisibility and facelessness into a position of assumed visibility and social presence.
Despite Tridentine legislation mandating strict enclosure, there is evidence that the audience may have included friends and relatives of the nuns, who viewed performances through a grill in the locutory of even in other locations in the convents.
Sor Juana's illegitimate birth was overlooked, as was common in that era, and there was no question that she maintained chastity and the cloistered state, but she was scarcely "dead to the world," what with her constant visits in the locutory with all and sundry from the court and her writing and publishing activities, nor did she keep the vow of poverty, becoming quite wealthy from her writing and investments, in part facilitated by her job as convent bookkeeper.
Hsieh's sustained commentary on the Chinese epigraphs is likewise elucidating, for example the weizi nan ("how difficult it is to be oneself") of "Perdre le midi quotidien," the opening poem of the "Steles du milieu" (a fifth and fictional direction Segalen had added to the four cardinal ones, and which pointed toward "le lieu par excellence"), an adaptation, Hsieh notes, of the Qing emperor Yongzheng's slogan weijun nan ("how difficult it is to be a sovereign"), an example of the more ciphered conduits through which the lyrical subject of Steles assumes on occasion the voice of Emperor, amongst other locutory positions in this "jeu de masques.