lodestone

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lode·stone

also load·stone  (lōd′stōn′)
n.
1. A piece of magnetite that has magnetic properties and attracts iron or steel.
2. One that attracts strongly.

[Middle English lode, way; see lode + stone (from its use by sailors to show the way).]

lodestone

(ˈləʊdˌstəʊn) or

loadstone

n
1. (Minerals)
a. a rock that consists of pure or nearly pure magnetite and thus is naturally magnetic
b. a piece of such rock, which can be used as a magnet and which was formerly used as a primitive compass
2. a person or thing regarded as a focus of attraction
[C16: literally: guiding stone]

lode•stone

or load•stone

(ˈloʊdˌstoʊn)

n.
1. a variety of magnetite that possesses magnetic polarity and attracts iron.
2. a piece of this serving as a magnet.
3. something that attracts strongly.
[1505–15; lode (in obsolete sense “way, course”) + stone]

lode·stone

also load·stone (lōd′stōn′)
A piece of the mineral magnetite that acts like a magnet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lodestone - a permanent magnet consisting of magnetite that possess polarity and has the power to attract as well as to be attracted magneticallylodestone - a permanent magnet consisting of magnetite that possess polarity and has the power to attract as well as to be attracted magnetically
permanent magnet, static magnet - a magnet that retains its magnetism after being removed from a magnetic field
magnetic iron-ore, magnetite - an oxide of iron that is strongly attracted by magnets
Translations
magnétite

lodestone

[ˈləʊdstəʊn] Npiedra f imán
References in classic literature ?
But the most gratifying thing of all was, that chance strangers, passing through, who had not heard of my picture, were not only drawn to it, as by a lodestone, the moment they entered the gallery, but always took it for a "Turner."
As I gazed at it on that far-gone night it seemed to call across the unthinkable void, to lure me to it, to draw me as the lodestone attracts a particle of iron.
He made accurate examination of it by the aid of some instruments, and came to the conclusion that it was carved from a lump of lodestone. He remembered that he had read somewhere of an ancient Egyptian god cut from a similar substance, and, thinking it over, he came to the conclusion that he must have read it in Sir Thomas Brown's POPULAR ERRORS, a book of the seventeenth century.
The balance was formed by the interaction of the two lodestones of American foreign policy.