logicism


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logicism

(ˈlɒdʒɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical theory that all of mathematics can be deduced from logic. Compare intuitionism, formalism

logicism

a philosophical system that places strong emphasis on logic.
See also: Philosophy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logicism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that all of mathematics can be derived from formal logic
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
References in periodicals archive ?
Fontanille (2011) says the body was excluded from semiotics theory by the formalism and especially by the logicism that prevailed in the structural linguistics from the 60's.
This paper will argue that the early Quine's engagement with Russell's logicism was a crucial stage in the development of his philosophy.
We started with the movement of logicism, with Frege, Russell and the early Wittgenstein, and moved on to Popper, Kuhn, Feyerabend, etc.
the mathematicism and logicism of Jewish neo-Kantianism".
The fourth is still in the Foucault arena but constitutes liberal political economy in terms of its philosophical assumptions and its deep connection with analytical philosophy, sharing the kind of logicism that inspired Frege, Russell and the early Wittgenstein upon whom I cut my philosophical teeth.
The three competing schools one century ago [30], namely logicism, formalism and constructivism, are somehow related to modern computer formalization (to signal only one aspect, constructive methods have been very reinforced by type theory, theory underlying the Coq proof assistant).
The researchers have to follow] first logicism, the view that the objective confirmation of scientific theory should conform to .
Veldman, "Brouwer's approximate fixed point theorem is equivalent to Brouwer's fan theorem", in Logicism, Intuitionism and Formalism, edited by Lindstrom, S.
This central trope is very dominant not only in the forms of logicism inaugurated by Frege, Russell and Wittgenstein and in the various strands of structuralism going back at least to Ferdinand de Saussure, Pierce, and Jacobson but also in development of European formalism per se.
Given the failure in the attempt to find a universal definition of the notion of probability through a more or less complex formula, the possibility of a return to a somewhat objectivist interpretation was posed from less stringent definitions based on a variant of logicism, known as the propensity theory, which combines the concept of probability to that of the potential possibilities.
Although firmly grounded in contemporary sciences of mind, cognitive ecology thus has little in common with the rigid rationalist logicism of classical forms of cognitivism.