logicist


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logicist

(ˈlɒdʒɪsɪst)
n
(Mathematics) a mathematician who uses the theory of logicism
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
the original logicist and phenomenalist projects in analytic philosophy
Even the apparently so ruthlessly neo-positivist logicist Wittgenstein found himself compelled to hint at a mysterious 'silence' in the final statement of his Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus.
Relevantly, the impossibility of science to reach systemic completeness demonstrated by Kurt Godel in symbolic logic in 1931 put to rest indeed almost a century of logicist and formalist attempts to find axioms on which to rigorously ground all mathematics: Hilbert's program, and the attempts of Alfred North Whitehead and Bertrand Russell in their famous Principia Mathematica (1910, 1912, 1913) are of paramount importance in this regard.
logicist project is, arguably, also the result of his not having
Frege's conceptual notation was invented for the purpose of proving his logicist thesis.
In spite of this, we see a return to almost 'logicist' tendencies within later medieval thinkers such as John Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, as discussed in the essays of Simo Knuuttila (Chapter 3, 'The Metaphysics of the Categories in John Duns Scotus') and Calvin G.
* antihipernormativism logicist si relansarea virtutilor awonorniativitatii in cunoastere, in baza incriminarii pretentiilor de universalizare a exigentelor normati-viste ale stiintelor tari;
other giants, such as logicist Russell, are content to do without when he states that he like[s] mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe--because, like Spinoza's God, it won't love us in return.
With `decisive clarity', the logicist hero of philosophy says: `The essence of science consists in the unity of foundations, systematic unity, in which not only particular knowledge but the foundations themselves, and along with them the higher complexes of foundations, called "theory", are assembled.' It does not matter how far Husserl went afterwards, from the initial logicism of his own point of view.
According to Frege's logicist thesis, every arithmetical concept can be defined in purely logical terms, and every theorem of arithmetic can be proved using only the basic laws of logic.