lognormality

log·nor·mal

 (lôg-nôr′məl, lŏg-)
adj. Mathematics
Of, relating to, or being a logarithmic function with a normal distribution.

log′nor·mal′i·ty (-măl′ĭ-tē) n.
log·nor′mal·ly adv.

lognormality

(ˌlɒɡnɔːˈmælɪtɪ)
n
(Mathematics) maths the condition of having a natural logarithm with normal distribution
References in periodicals archive ?
One limitation is the increasing uncertainty about the accuracy of the lognormality of sensitivity in cases of low background exposure levels and correspondingly small incidence values (Crump et al.
Valles, "Flow lognormality and spatial correlation in crustal reservoirs-I: physical character & consequences for geothermal energy," in Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2015, p.
A similar result holds for multivariate lognormality of stochastic variables and aggregate wealth with constant proportional risk aversion on the part of the investor.
To test the normality or lognormality hypothesis, the Kolmogorov-smirnov test was performed, at 5% of probability.
On sorting, sorting coefficients and lognormality of the grain size distribution.
The (two-parameter) lognormal distribution has its genesis in the Law of Proportionate Effect, which predicts lognormality among a population of individuals each of whose income faces the same odds of growing or shrinking by any proportionate rate; the lognormal basically derives from a process of equality of proportionate growth opportunity and deviations from lognormality may indicate the absence of such opportunity.
It might seem that the assumption of lognormality is grossly inconsistent with the evidence for stock markets, but much of that evidence is for high-frequency time-series data conditional on prior returns.
By the lognormality assumption, the distribution of the insured-asset-value [V.sub.t] at time t is related to its initial value v at time zero by,
In testing for goodness-of-fit between the actual log distributions and the normal distribution, lognormality is rejected below the 1% level of significance for C1 to C6, both in 1991 or 2001.
In addition, b can be derived as described below in Equation (2) by assuming lognormality of the market returns.