logography


Also found in: Wikipedia.

lo·gog·ra·phy

 (lō-gŏg′rə-fē)
n.
The use of logotypes in design and printing.

logography

(lɒˈɡɒɡrəfɪ)
n
(formerly) a method of longhand reporting
loˈgographer n

logography

a method of reporting spoken language in longhand, esp. one using several reporters taking down a few words in succession. — logographer, n.logographic, adj.
See also: Writing
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is the manner in which speech is represented in the orthography, where English is alphabetic, such that all sounds are graphically (albeit opaquely) represented, Arabic is an abjad, where the letters represent consonants and vowels are mostly missing, and Chinese is a logography, where the phonology is not directly represented by the characters at all.
The researchers tested children with training in one of four types of writing: alphabetic (Spanish), abjad (Hebrew), logography (Chinese) and syllabary (Korean).
(2) However, it would be useful to provide an outline of some pivotal conclusions concerning the function and significance of storytelling in forensic practice, and, where appropriate, draw parallels with Athenian logography. (3)
According to Frith (1985), logography language uses a graphemic unit as a symbol that represents meaning.
To learn to read in a logography, students must memorize the whole symbol for each new word they learn to read.
His approach of relying mainly on internal analysis of the script seems sound, and on this basis he reaches a classification of it as being a combination of logography and semasiography.
This, along with Thucydides' well-known remark at 1.22.1 that he and his informers found it hard to remember the precise words of the speeches he recreates, strongly supports the theory that deliberative (as opposed to forensic) speeches were not regularly published in the fifth century, but equally accords with the idea that there was little distinction drawn in that period between forensic and deliberative oratory.(28) Pseudo-Plutarch's list of those who did practise logography when Antiphon was already old similarly contains the names of politicians (Alcibiades, Critias, and Archinus) alongside that of Lysias.
Derrida's discussion of the Phaedrus begins at the "geographical" center of the dialogue (275c) with the deprecation of the profession of logography. The logographer, who writes orations for trials in which he himself does not appear, represents, for Derrida, the intersection of two crucial phenomena: the presence of the absence (the writer of the speech is present only by means of his own cited words, while being physically absent from the trial), and the gap between writing and truth.