logophobia

logophobia

an abnormal fear or dislike of words.
See also: Language
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Logophobia: A person suffering from logophobia may be alright while having a conversation but may find life difficult while reading written or printed words.
It is worth noting especially that the logophobia of uttering the word 'bribe' gave rise to the refurbishing of the expression to strip it first of any legal consequences, and importantly to render it incapable of eliciting outrage of any kind.
[a] tendency [that] veers into logophobia in The Birds, which is about the futility of language" (142).
Kaufman attempts to avoid the "contagious logophobia" among historians of this contested Elizabethan Protestantism by adopting Charles Prior's choice of "conformist" and "reformist"--defined by the degree of satisfaction with the English church's state of reform--with the caveat that "puritan" is useful for "Calvinist pietists" who internalized their dissatisfaction with reform by emphasizing their co-religionists' prodigality through excessive sermonizing and devotional literature (11).
(8.) Radulescu, Adina (2012), "Taking Logophobia Seriously," Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 11: 147-152.
(1) Pigliucci holds that, as Shackel puts it, logophobics have developed an arsenal of strategies to obfuscate clear thinking: logophobia is a skeptical doctrine about rationality where it is whatever we make it, and what we make it depends on what we value.
Such forms of magical thinking recall Michel Foucault's comments on logophobia in his 1970 inaugural lecture at the College de France, given at a moment in his career when he seemed to be looking ahead to his work on biopolitics:
But the logophobia of the establishment can take far more sinister forms.