loiterer


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loi·ter

 (loi′tər)
intr.v. loi·tered, loi·ter·ing, loi·ters
1.
a. To stand idly about; linger without any purpose.
b. Law To violate a law or ordinance that prohibits persons from remaining in a given location without a clear purpose for an extended period of time, especially when behaving in a manner indicating a possible threat to persons or property in the vicinity.
2. To hover over or remain near an area: Fog loitered over the mountains. A jet loitered in the sky near the airbase.
3. To proceed slowly or with many stops: loitered all the way home.
4. To act slowly or with leisure; take one's time: "The organist loitered over the keys, making sure of his mastery of the coming Sabbath anthem" (O. Henry).

[Middle English loitren, probably from Middle Dutch loteren, to totter, be loose.]

loi′ter·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loiterer - someone who lingers aimlessly in or about a place
dawdler, laggard, lagger, trailer, poke, drone - someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind

loiterer

noun
Translations

loiterer

nHerumtreiber(in) m(f), → Herumlungerer m; (= straggler)Nachzügler(in) m(f), → Bummelant(in) m(f) (inf)
References in classic literature ?
The loiterer often blames delay on his more active friend.
There were no spectators of our contest except now and again some loiterer in the Gardens who little thought what was the stake for which we played, but cannot we conceive Barbara standing at the ropes and agitatedly cutting down the daisies every time David missed the ball?
Raffles, walking with the uneasy gait of a town loiterer obliged to do a bit of country journeying on foot, looked as incongruous amid this moist rural quiet and industry as if he had been a baboon escaped from a menagerie.
It seemed as if the procession, which had been gradually filling up its ranks, were now about to move, and that this loud peal of the wailing trumpets, and roll of the muffled drums, were a call to some loiterer to make haste.
Some purpose or other is so natural to every one, that a mere loiterer always looks and feels remarkable.
From hence the low murmur of his pupils' voices, conning over their lessons, might be heard in a drowsy summer's day, like the hum of a beehive; interrupted now and then by the authoritative voice of the master, in the tone of menace or command, or, peradventure, by the appalling sound of the birch, as he urged some tardy loiterer along the flowery path of knowledge.
A lady looking at him through raised lorgnettes turned and whispered something with a smile to her companion - once before he had heard an audible titter from a little group of loiterers.
On the yon side of the fields uprose the sturdy oaks and beeches and ashes of the forest; while at their feet modest violets peeped out shyly and greeted the loiterers with an odor which made the heart glad.
While one of these loiterers showed the red skin and wild accouterments of a native of the woods, the other exhibited, through the mask of his rude and nearly savage equipments, the brighter, though sun-burned and long-faced complexion of one who might claim descent from a European parentage.
Poyser delighted in this noisy exit; it was a fresh assurance to her that the farm-yard was well guarded, and that no loiterers could enter unobserved; and it was not until the gate had closed behind the captain that she turned into the kitchen again, where Dinah stood with her bonnet in her hand, waiting to speak to her aunt, before she set out for Lisbeth Bede's cottage.
The captain reconnoitered the shore with his glass, and, to his infinite vexation, saw the loiterers in the full enjoyment of their "wildgoose-chase.
At such an hour there were only a few people upon the platform, and two stalwart station policemen easily kept back the loiterers whose curiosity had been excited by the arrival of the special.