longline

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long·line

 (lông′līn′, lŏng′-)
n.
A heavy fishing line usually several miles long and having a series of baited hooks.

long′-lin′ing n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

longline

(ˈlɒŋˌlaɪn)
n
(Fishing) a type of fishing-line used in deep water
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Spider-rigging and long-lining were the winning tactics at the Bass Pro Shops Crappie Masters Florida State Championship.
Others chose long-lining, or "pulling"--basically slow-trolling, fishing jigs or minnows off the stern.
Tim Nevard, of the Conservation Foundation, said: "In a year when fish stocks are low, the impact of long-lining on the few albatrosses that survive natures challenges could be catastrophic.
Already in the Falkland Islands, traditionally the stronghold of the black-browed albatross, the species has lost 86,000 breeding pairs over the last five years, almost certainly because of long-lining.
"It's a tragedy, really, as only a relatively minor change to long-lining techniques might have easily saved her life."
Another four birds, championed by Phil Tufnell, Brian May, Sir Ranulph Fiennes and Jeremy Vine are feared dead but not through long-lining.
It's a tragedy really as only a minor change to long-lining techniques might easily have saved her life.''
Jerry said: "It's a tragedy really as only a relatively minor change to long-lining techniques might have easily saved her life."