long-lived

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long-lived

 (lông′līvd′, -lĭvd′, lŏng′-)
adj.
1. Having a long life: a long-lived aunt.
2. Lasting a long time; persistent: a long-lived rumor.
3. Functioning a long time; durable: a long-lived light bulb.

[Middle English long-lifed : long, long; see long1 + life, life; see life + -ed, having; see -ed3.]

long′-lived′ness n.
Word History: Some uncertainty exists as to the correct pronunciation of long-lived. Should one say (lông′līvd′) or (lông′lĭvd′)? The answer depends in part on how one looks at the word. Historically, the first pronunciation is the more accurate. The word was formed in Middle English times as a compound of long and the noun life, plus the suffix -ed. This suffix, though identical in form to the past tense suffix, has a different function: to form adjectives from nouns, as in the words hook-nosed, ruddy-faced, and round-shouldered. (Note that English has no verbs such as "to hook-nose," and "to ruddy-face," that would have formed participial adjectives ending in -ed.) In Middle English, the suffix -ed was always pronounced as a full syllable, so long-lifed (as it was then spelled) had three syllables. The f in the middle, by a rule of earlier English phonology, was voiced between the two vowels to (v); eventually, the spelling became long-lived to reflect the pronunciation. (We see the same alternation in life and lives; in Middle English, lives had two syllables just like -lived.) However, this new spelling introduced an ambiguity; it was no longer clear from the spelling that the word came from the noun life, but rather looked as though it came from the verb live. In this way a second pronunciation, (lông′lĭvd′), was introduced.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

long-lived

adj
having long life, existence, or currency
ˌlong-ˈlivedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

long′-lived′

(-ˈlaɪvd, -ˈlɪvd)

adj.
1. having a long life or duration: a long-lived animal; long-lived fame.
2. lasting or functioning a long time: a long-lived battery.
[1375–1425]
long′-lived′ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.long-lived - existing for a long time; "hopes for a durable peace"; "a long-lasting friendship"
long - primarily temporal sense; being or indicating a relatively great or greater than average duration or passage of time or a duration as specified; "a long life"; "a long boring speech"; "a long time"; "a long friendship"; "a long game"; "long ago"; "an hour long"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

long-lived

adjective long-lasting, enduring, full of years, old as Methuselah, longevous long-lived radioactive material
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

long-lived

adjective
Existing or remaining in the same state for an indefinitely long time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

long-lived

[ˈlɒŋˈlɪvd] ADJ [person, species] → longevo, de larga vida; [plant] → duradero; [rumour] → duradero, persistente
women are more long-lived than menlas mujeres son más longevas que los hombres
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

long-lived

[ˈlɒŋˈlɪvd] adjlongevo/a
women are longer-lived or more long-lived than men → le donne vivono più a lungo degli uomini
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995