long-term


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long-term

(lông′tûrm′, lŏng′-)
adj.
Involving, maturing after, or being in effect for a long time: a long-term investment.

long-term

adj
1. lasting, staying, or extending over a long time: long-term prospects.
2. (Banking & Finance) finance maturing after a long period of time: a long-term bond.

long′-term`



adj.
1. covering or involving a relatively long period of time: long-term memory.
2. maturing after a relatively long period of time: a long-term bond.
3. (of a capital gain or loss) derived from the sale or exchange of an asset held for more than a specified time, as six months or one year.
[1905–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.long-term - relating to or extending over a relatively long time; "the long-run significance of the elections"; "the long-term reconstruction of countries damaged by the war"; "a long-term investment"
long - primarily temporal sense; being or indicating a relatively great or greater than average duration or passage of time or a duration as specified; "a long life"; "a long boring speech"; "a long time"; "a long friendship"; "a long game"; "long ago"; "an hour long"
Translations

long-term

[ˈlɒŋˈtɜːm]
A. ADJ [effect, investment, care, solution] → a largo plazo
joining the army is a long-term commitmententrar en el ejército significa comprometerse a largo plazo
the drug's long-term effectslos efectos del medicamento a largo plazo
this will have a long-term effect on unemploymentesto tendrá un efecto a largo plazo sobre el desempleo
they're in a long-term relationshipllevan tiempo juntos
I've had several long-term relationshipshe tenido varias relaciones sentimentales duraderas
the long-term unemployed las personas que llevan mucho tiempo sin trabajo
long-term unemploymentel desempleo de larga duración
B. CPD long-term car park Nparking m para aparcamiento or (LAm) estacionamiento prolongado
long-term memory Nmemoria f a largo plazo

long-term

[ˈlɒŋˈtɜːm] adj (plans, effects) → a lungo termine
to take a long-term view of sth → proiettare qc nel futuro

long-term

adj a largo plazo
References in classic literature ?
Caverly owned farms in Orange County that had been leased out for long periods (the lives of three persons named at the moment the lease was granted) but which were now about to revert to him--such long-term leases, in the Hudson Valley, led to the so-called anti-rent war that was breaking out at the time Cooper wrote this book; twelve and a half cents = an English shilling, still often used in conversation in America; nabobs = rich men (usually businessmen of recent affluence)}
meeting, one of the core group firms told me that an investor group would make an offer to acquire the Long-Term portfolio.
An increase in the long-term cost of money makes long-term lenders reluctant to fund their previously issued commitments.
The American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) has reported 79% of its members incorrectly believed a long-term nursing-home stay would be financed through Medicare.
Predictably, nearly all survey respondents preferred long-term investors, but, less predictably, over half--58 percent--said active long-term investors are most helpful in maximizing the long-term value of their companies.
The number of nonelderly needing longterm care, while smaller, is also increasing dramatically, growing at twice the rate of the elderly needing long-term care services.
Stanford University School of Medicine researchers report that the protein kinases -- several related substances involved in the regulation of chemical messengers and their receptors in neurons -- are key to the chemical mechanisms underlying long-term potentiation.
Fitch further notes that capitalization, while sufficient for the 'AA' long-term rating level, does not now provide a cushion for further upward ratings progress.
Plaintiffs' attorneys portray the companies that own long-term care facilities as "always placing profits above people.
Yet, such unexpected happenings occur every day throughout the country and, when they do, not only is the person in need of long-term care further victimized if he or she doesn't have adequate LTC insurance, but, so too, in countless situations, are family members.
Private insurance products designed to price and spread the risk of catastrophic long-term care expenses would have evolved early and fast.
The proposals represent the most ambitious effort to deal with the long-term care needs of the elderly since the collapse of Clinton's plan to guarantee health insurance for all Americans in 1994.