longline

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long·line

 (lông′līn′, lŏng′-)
n.
A heavy fishing line usually several miles long and having a series of baited hooks.

long′-lin′ing n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

longline

(ˈlɒŋˌlaɪn)
n
(Fishing) a type of fishing-line used in deep water
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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This species occurs as bycatch in a variety of fisheries, including those using trawls and pelagic or bottom longlines (Krefft, 1980; Yano and Tanaka, 1984; Nakaya and Shirai, 1992; Pajuelo et al., 2010; Zhu et al., 2012; Romanov et al., 2013) at depths of 27-2000 m (Compagno, 1984; Last and Stevens, 1994).
To federal managers, and, in some cases, congressmen, we pled the case for action to save swordfish, marlin and other species from longlines.
The fisher job satisfaction and the longlines damage seabed components in the socio-ecological perceptions study also received a green light because of fishers' contentedness in their communities and desire to continue fishing with the same gear type, and their belief that their fishing gear does not negatively impact the sea floor ecosystem.
Uruguayan AC marine artisanal fisheries (i.e., defined as vessels with <10 Gross Registered Tonnage by DINARA) use almost exclusively gillnets and longlines. These fisheries operate between the coast and 15 nm offshore, in vessels from 4 to 10 m in length ([bar.x] = 7.5 m), powered by outboard engines ([bar.x] = 48 HP), with a small crew ([bar.x] = 3 people) and low levels of technology and capital investment per fishermen (Puig, 2006; Puig et al., 2010; DINARA, 2012).
The method of foraging by gannets lends them to picking up bait fish on longlines, as they are considered to obtain prey usually by rapid, vertical, shallow plunge dives (17) and are notorious for picking up floating debris, including netting, from the sea surface.
Crowder, "Quantifying the effects of fisheries on threatened species: the impact of pelagic longlines on loggerhead and leatherback sea turtles," Ecology Letters, vol.
DOCTARI LONGLINES: LONGLINE RIGS & OPEN WATER HUNTING EQUIPMENT Stainless Longline Clips, Swivels, Split Rings, Flags, Mainlines, Drops and much more.
What with the mercury, the salt, the BPA-laden cans, and the harm to other marine life caused by fishing with longlines or nets, you can't enjoy a decent tuna fish sandwich.
Given that the number of breeding pairs in the South Georgia population in that period was estimated to be in the order of 1,500 pairs (Thomson et al., 2009), this level of mortality from pelagic longlines is of concern.
According to the research, there was evidence of substantial reductions in the number of birds accidentally ensnared as "bycatch" in the longlines in some fisheries.
The RSPB and its global partner BirdLife International are calling on EU Fisheries Commissioner Joe Borg to implement measures which would reduce the number of seabirds caught on longlines and gill-nets in Europe's fisheries.
Sharks are especially vulnerable to illegal "longlines" (fishing nets strung across dozens if not hundreds of miles of ocean), where they get inadvertently snared along with the tuna and swordfish fishermen intend to catch.