looking-glass


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Related to looking-glass: looking-glass self

look′ing glass`


n.
1. a mirror.
2. the glass used in a mirror.
[1526]

look′ing-glass`


adj.
having the normal elements or circumstances reversed; topsy-turvy: a looking-glass world.
[alluding to the reversed world in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass (1871)]
Translations

looking-glass

(o.f.) [ˈlʊkɪŋglɑːs] N (frm) → espejo m

looking-glass

[ˈlukɪŋˌglɑːs] n (old) → specchio

look

(luk) verb
1. to turn the eyes in a certain direction so as to see, to find, to express etc. He looked out of the window; I've looked everywhere, but I can't find him; He looked at me (angrily).
2. to seem. It looks as if it's going to rain; She looks sad.
3. to face. The house looks west.
noun
1. the act of looking or seeing. Let me have a look!
2. a glance. a look of surprise.
3. appearance. The house had a look of neglect.
ˈlook-alike noun
a person who looks (exactly) like someone else; a double. the prince's look-alike.
-looking
having a certain appearance. good-looking; strange-looking.
looks noun plural
(attractive) appearance. She lost her looks as she grew older; good looks.
ˌlooker-ˈon noun
a person who is watching something happening; an onlooker.
ˈlooking-glass noun
a mirror.
ˈlookout noun
1. a careful watch. a sharp lookout; (also adjective) a lookout post.
2. a place from which such a watch can be kept.
3. a person who has been given the job of watching. There was a shout from the lookout.
4. concern, responsibility. If he catches you leaving early, that's your lookout!
by the look(s) of
judging from the appearance of (someone or something) it seems likely or probable. By the looks of him, he won't live much longer; It's going to rain by the look of it.
look after
to attend to or take care of. to look after the children.
look ahead
to consider what will happen in the future.
look down one's nose at
to regard with contempt.
look down on
to regard as inferior. She looks down on her husband's relations.
look for
to search for. She lost her handbag and wasted ten minutes looking for it.
look forward to
to wait with pleasure for. I am looking forward to seeing you / to the holidays.
look here!
give your attention to this. Look here! Isn't that what you wanted?; Look here, Mary, you're being unfair!
look in on
to visit briefly. I decided to look in on Paul and Carol on my way home.
look into
to inspect or investigate closely. The manager will look into your complaint.
look on
1. to watch something. No, I don't want to play – I'd rather look on.
2. (with as) to think of or consider. I have lived with my aunt since I was a baby, and I look on her as my mother.
look out
1. (usually with for) to watch. She was looking out for him from the window.
2. to find by searching. I've looked out these books for you.
look out!
beware! take care!.
look over
to examine. We have been looking over the new house.
look through
to look at or study briefly. I've looked through your notes.
look up
1. to improve. Things have been looking up lately.
2. to pay a visit to. I looked up several old friends.
3. to search for in a book of reference. You should look the word up (in a dictionary).
4. to consult (a reference book). I looked up in the encyclopedia.
look up to
to respect the conduct, opinions etc of. He has always looked up to his father.
References in classic literature ?
So, to punish it, she held it up to the Looking-glass, that it might see how sulky it was--'and if you're not good directly,' she added, 'I'll put you through into Looking-glass House.
asked Stepan Arkadyevitch, taking the telegram and seating himself at the looking-glass.
Each of our cabins had its own looking-glass screwed to the bulkhead, and what he wanted with more of them we never could fathom.
well, I know not how that may be; it is, no doubt, a cunning way of flattering the king; but the looking-glass was too large for me.
It was a looking-glass on the other side," explained Father Brown.
When he had got a light he saw that she had taken away all her things and the baby's (he had noticed on entering that the go-cart was not in its usual place on the landing, but thought Mildred had taken the baby out;) and all the things on the washing-stand had been broken, a knife had been drawn cross-ways through the seats of the two chairs, the pillow had been slit open, there were large gashes in the sheets and the counterpane, the looking-glass appeared to have been broken with a hammer.
In these lengthened vigils, his brain often reeled, and visions seemed to flit before him; perhaps seen doubtfully, and by a faint light of their own, in the remote dimness of the chamber, or more vividly and close beside him, within the looking-glass.
On the looking-glass were lists of definitions and pronunciations; when shaving, or dressing, or combing his hair, he conned these lists over.
Alfred Smirk considered himself very handsome; he spent a great deal of time about his hair, whiskers and necktie, before a little looking-glass in the harness-room.
She could see quite well the pegs in the old painted linen-press on which she hung her hat and gown; she could see the head of every pin on her red cloth pin-cushion; she could see a reflection of herself in the old- fashioned looking-glass, quite as distinct as was needful, considering that she had only to brush her hair and put on her night-cap.