loosing


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loose

 (lo͞os)
adj. loos·er, loos·est
1. Not fastened, restrained, or contained: loose bricks.
2. Not taut, fixed, or rigid: a loose anchor line; a loose chair leg.
3. Free from confinement or imprisonment; unfettered: criminals loose in the neighborhood; dogs that are loose on the streets.
4. Not tight-fitting or tightly fitted: loose shoes.
5. Not bound, bundled, stapled, or gathered together: loose papers.
6. Not compact or dense in arrangement or structure: loose gravel.
7. Lacking a sense of restraint or responsibility; idle: loose talk.
8. Not formal; relaxed: a loose atmosphere at the club.
9. Lacking conventional moral restraint in sexual behavior.
10. Not literal or exact: a loose translation.
11. Characterized by a free movement of fluids in the body: a loose cough; loose bowels.
adv.
In a loose manner.
tr.v. loosed, loos·ing, loos·es
1. To let loose; release: loosed the dogs.
2. To make loose; undo: loosed his belt.
3. To cast loose; detach: hikers loosing their packs at camp.
4. To let fly; discharge: loosed an arrow.
5. To release pressure or obligation from; absolve: loosed her from the responsibility.
6. To make less strict; relax: a leader's strong authority that was loosed by easy times.
Idiom:
on the loose
1. At large; free.
2. Acting in an uninhibited fashion.

[Middle English louse, los, from Old Norse lauss; see leu- in Indo-European roots.]

loose′ly adv.
loose′ness n.
Synonyms: loose, lax, slack1
These adjectives mean not tautly bound, held, or fastened: loose reins; a lax rope; slack sails.
Antonym: tight

loosing

(ˈluːsɪŋ; -zɪŋ; ˈlɔɪ-) or

lowsening

n
dialect Yorkshire a celebration of one's 21st birthday
References in classic literature ?
Well, I warn't long loosing the whoops down amongst the towheads; and I only tried to chase them a little while, anyway, be- cause it was worse than chasing a Jack-o'-lantern.
Team of Rawalpindi led by Zaid Khan had made scores of 275 in one innings in 70 overs by loosing five wickets.
The word "loosing" (often the Spanish speaker's pronunciation for "losing") refers to the immigrants' losing not only a language but also a way of being that does not translate completely into a new culture.