loquacious


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

lo·qua·cious

 (lō-kwā′shəs)
adj.
Very talkative; garrulous.

[From Latin loquāx, loquāc-, from loquī, to speak; see tolkw- in Indo-European roots.]

lo·qua′cious·ly adv.
lo·qua′cious·ness, lo·quac′i·ty (lō-kwăs′ĭ-tē) n.

loquacious

(lɒˈkweɪʃəs)
adj
characterized by or showing a tendency to talk a great deal
[C17: from Latin loquāx from loquī to speak]
loˈquaciously adv
loquacity, loˈquaciousness n

lo•qua•cious

(loʊˈkweɪ ʃəs)

adj.
talking or tending to talk much or freely; garrulous.
[1660–70; < Latin loquāx, s. loquāc-, derivative of loquī to speak; see -acious]
lo•qua′cious•ly, adv.
lo•qua′cious•ness, lo•quac′i•ty (-ˈkwæs ɪ ti) n.
syn: See talkative.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.loquacious - full of trivial conversation; "kept from her housework by gabby neighbors"
voluble - marked by a ready flow of speech; "she is an extremely voluble young woman who engages in soliloquies not conversations"

loquacious

adjective talkative, chattering, babbling, chatty, wordy, garrulous, gabby (informal), voluble, gossipy, gassy (informal), blathering The normally loquacious man said little.

loquacious

adjective
Given to conversation:
Slang: gabby.
Translations
pratig

loquacious

[ləˈkweɪʃəs] ADJ (frm) → locuaz

loquacious

[ləˈkweɪʃəs] (formal) adj (= talkative, garrulous) → loquace

loquacious

adjredselig

loquacious

[ləˈkweɪʃəs] adj (frm) → loquace
References in classic literature ?
Why, really," said the physician, with an amusing consciousness of his own resemblance to the loquacious barber of the Arabian Nights, "this is very interesting.
Just then my mother came in, and created a diversion in my favour by her loquacious and animated welcome of the reverend guest.
cried the loquacious stranger, as they came out under the low archway, which in those days formed the entrance to the coach-yard.
Nez Perce camp A chief with a hard name The Big Hearts of the East Hospitable treatment The Indian guides Mysterious councils The loquacious chief Indian tomb Grand Indian reception An Indian feast Town-criers Honesty of the Nez Perces The captain's attempt at healing.
His favorite occupation when not playing boston, a card game he was very fond of, was that of listener, especially when he succeeded in setting two loquacious talkers at one another.
When the room and books had been shown, with some bickerings between the brother and sister that I did my utmost to appease or mitigate, Mary Ann brought me her doll, and began to be very loquacious on the subject of its fine clothes, its bed, its chest of drawers, and other appurtenances; but Tom told her to hold her clamour, that Miss Grey might see his rocking-horse, which, with a most important bustle, he dragged forth from its corner into the middle of the room, loudly calling on me to attend to it.
With many loquacious assurances that they would be agreeably surprised in the aspect of the criminal, the doctor drew the young lady's arm through one of him; and offering his disengaged hand to Mrs.
They began to talk, and finding Clutton more loquacious and less sardonic than usual, Philip determined to take advantage of his good humour.
Here Miss Knag paused to take breath, and while she pauses it may be observed--not that she was marvellously loquacious and marvellously deferential to Madame Mantalini, since these are facts which require no comment; but that every now and then, she was accustomed, in the torrent of her discourse, to introduce a loud, shrill, clear 'hem
Enough, enough," cried Middleton, too impatient to wait until the deliberative and perhaps loquacious old man could end his minute explanation.
It is quite a relief to have, sitting opposite, that little girl of fifteen with the loquacious chin: who, to do her justice, acts up to it, and fully identifies nature's handwriting, for of all the small chatterboxes that ever invaded the repose of drowsy ladies' cabin, she is the first and foremost.
To expand, without bothering about it--without shiftless timidity on one side, or loquacious eagerness on the other--to the full compass of what he would have called a "pleasant" experience, was Newman's most definite programme of life.