loquitur


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loquitur

(ˈlɒkwɪtə)
(Theatre) he (or she) speaks: used, esp formerly, as a stage direction. Usually abbreviated to: loq
References in classic literature ?
Interdum stultus opportuna loquitur "--"Why, which of them," cries Jones, "would you recommend?"--"Truly neither of them," answered Partridge.
loquitur : Clarice has omitted to tell you that she looked exceedingly pretty at dinner, and made a conquest by which she has bound herself to learn the Greek alphabet.
Her calm demeanor is res ipsa loquitur (the thing speaks for itself).
Indeed, this Court's recent rulings areres ipsa loquitur: a writ of kalikasan over the West Philippine Sea a writ of amparo and habeas data pro the National Union of People's Lawyers and dismissing as ridiculous the Solicitor General's invocation of national security in refusing to release government documents on the drug war.
Despite the offering of evidence to support specific negligence, the judge ultimately instructed the jurors that they could consider the matter on the basis of res ipsa loquitur that is, the mere fact of an accident's occurrence raises an inference of negligence.
He sought relief under FELA using the legal doctrine of "res ipsa loquitur," a doctrine that asks a finder of fact to infer liability when (as the Latin is often translated) "the thing speaks for itself." Because of the burden-shifting nature of the doctrine, it requires some baseline conditionsnamely that the defendant was in control of the instrumentality that caused the injury and that the plaintiff was not also negligent.
If yes, vote Patrick Obahiagbon for Edo South Senatorial District seat.' He is a lawyer and, in the legal parlance, they say res ipsa loquitur, meaning the fact of the lines speaks for itself.
In short, the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur does not apply to gross negligence cases and speculation or conjecture is not permitted to create a question of fact."
Expert testimony is a requirement in medical malpractice lawsuits, unless a plaintiff can successfully invoke the res ipsa loquitur doctrine.
Additional interesting and useful topics covered, where general knowledge is often lacking, include chapter 4, 'The legal liability of the Good Samaritan doctor', chapter 9, 'The recalcitrant practitioner: Disciplinary procedures', and an informative chapter 12, 'Res ipsa loquitur. However, a particular highlight and vital contribution is the comprehensive section on experts and their evidence in chapters 14 and 15 for those medical specialists who are prepared to assist lawyers but have no idea what they are going to be confronted with in court.
The facts here fall within the domain of common knowledge, or res ipsa loquitur; so the case will not have to depend on an expert witness.
DeWitt sued the two businesses, holding both liable for negligence and relying in part on the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur, which holds that the occurrence of an accident implies negligence.