lore

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lore 1

 (lôr)
n.
Accumulated knowledge or beliefs held by a group about a subject, especially when passed from generation to generation by oral tradition. See Synonyms at knowledge.

[Middle English, from Old English lār; see leis- in Indo-European roots.]

lore 2

 (lôr)
n.
The space between the eye and the base of the bill of a bird or between the eye and nostril of a snake.

[Latin lōrum, thong.]

lor′e·al (lôr′ē-əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lore

(lɔː)
n
1. collective knowledge or wisdom on a particular subject, esp of a traditional nature
2. knowledge or learning
3. archaic teaching, or something that is taught
[Old English lār; related to leornian to learn]

lore

(lɔː)
n
1. (Zoology) the surface of the head of a bird between the eyes and the base of the bill
2. (Zoology) the corresponding area in a snake or fish
[C19: from New Latin lōrum, from Latin: strap]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lore1

(lɔr, loʊr)

n.
1. the body of knowledge, esp. of a traditional, anecdotal, or popular nature, on a particular subject: nature lore; local lore.
2. learning, knowledge, or erudition.
3. Archaic.
a. the process or act of teaching; instruction.
b. something that is taught; lesson.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English lār, c. Old Frisian lāre, Old Saxon, Old High German lēra; compare learn]

lore2

(lɔr, loʊr)

n.
the space between the eye and the bill of a bird, or a corresponding space in other animals, as snakes.
[1615–25; < New Latin lōrum, Latin: thong, strap]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

lore

- Originally meant "the act of teaching" or a "piece of instruction, lesson."
See also related terms for instruction.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lore - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdotelore - knowledge gained through tradition or anecdote; "early peoples passed on plant and animal lore through legend"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
old wives' tale - a bit of lore passed on by word of mouth
folklore - the unwritten lore (stories and proverbs and riddles and songs) of a culture
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

lore

noun
1. traditions, sayings, experience, saws, teaching, beliefs, wisdom, doctrine, mythos, folk-wisdom, traditional wisdom the Book of the Sea, which was stuffed with sailors' lore.
2. learning, knowledge, know-how (informal), scholarship, letters, erudition prophets and diviners, knowledgeable in the lore of the stars
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

lore

noun
1. That which is known about a specific subject or situation:
2. A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
3. That which is known; the sum of what has been perceived, discovered, or inferred:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
معرِفَه متوارَثَه عن موضوع
tradice
overlevering
fróîleikur
išmintistradicinis žinojimas
zināšanas

lore

[lɔːʳ] Nsaber m popular
in local loresegún la tradición local
he knows a lot about plant loresabe mucho de plantas
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

lore

[ˈlɔːr] ntraditions fpl
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

lore

nÜberlieferungen pl; in local lorenach hiesiger Überlieferung; plant lorePflanzenkunde f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

lore

[lɔːʳ] ntradizioni fpl
plant/weather lore → cognizioni fpl sulle piante/sul tempo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

lore

(loː) noun
knowledge handed down on a subject. the lore of the sea.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Lore (two syllables) was a water nymph who used to sit on a high rock called the Ley or Lei (pronounced like our word LIE) in the Rhine, and lure boatmen to destruction in a furious rapid which marred the channel at that spot.
"with all his lore, Wherefore he sang, or whence the mandate sped."
His head was full of tales of wild exploits, of battles, of ghosts and fairies too, for he was an Irishman and knew and loved the Celtic lore. Besides all this he wrote poetry.
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore, While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping, As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
It was necessary that Captain Jim should be near him as he wrote, for consultation upon many matters of sea-faring and gulf lore of which Owen was quite ignorant.
"So it does," said Don Quixote, "and he is a sage magician, a great enemy of mine, who has a spite against me because he knows by his arts and lore that in process of time I am to engage in single combat with a knight whom he befriends and that I am to conquer, and he will be unable to prevent it; and for this reason he endeavours to do me all the ill turns that he can; but I promise him it will be hard for him to oppose or avoid what is decreed by Heaven."
You've had enough already." Concluding thus the parson rode on his way, with doubts as to his discretion in retailing this curious bit of lore.
But you're so positive you know all the lore of the forest.
But, happy Sissy's happy children loving her; all children loving her; she, grown learned in childish lore; thinking no innocent and pretty fancy ever to be despised; trying hard to know her humbler fellow-creatures, and to beautify their lives of machinery and reality with those imaginative graces and delights, without which the heart of infancy will wither up, the sturdiest physical manhood will be morally stark death, and the plainest national prosperity figures can show, will be the Writing on the Wall, - she holding this course as part of no fantastic vow, or bond, or brotherhood, or sisterhood, or pledge, or covenant, or fancy dress, or fancy fair; but simply as a duty to be done, - did Louisa see these things of herself?
OEDIPUS Teiresias, seer who comprehendest all, Lore of the wise and hidden mysteries, High things of heaven and low things of the earth, Thou knowest, though thy blinded eyes see naught, What plague infects our city; and we turn To thee, O seer, our one defense and shield.
"Let Nature be your teacher: Sweet is the lore which Nature brings.
The daughter was just leaving the house to attend the meeting of a branch Folk Lore Society, and regretted that she could not accompany them.