loss ratio


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loss ratio

n.
The ratio between the premiums paid to an insurance company and the claims settled by the company.

loss ratio

n
(Insurance) the ratio of the annual losses sustained to the premiums received by an insurance company

loss′ ra`tio


n.
the ratio of the losses paid by an insurer to premiums earned for a given period.
[1925–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loss ratio - the ratio of the annual claims paid by an insurance company to the premiums received
ratio - the relative magnitudes of two quantities (usually expressed as a quotient)
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References in periodicals archive ?
If the medical loss ratio is less than the percentage threshold--85 percent for large employer coverage or 80 percent for small employer and individual coverage--the carrier must pay the difference between the actual ratio and the minimum target as a refund.
Profit margins in the long term insurance business have been under pressure, with Samsung F&M's risk loss ratio having increased for two consecutive years in fiscal years 2008 and 2009.
The regulation will allow insurers to deduct federal and state taxes that apply to health insurance coverage from an insurer's premium revenue when calculating its medical loss ratio.
The methodology employed here and described in later sections is useful for short-term changes in the loss ratio but does not address those long-term effects.
A contingency contract that pays $0 for a 10 percent loss ratio and 0 percent growth on $1 million premium, but pays $25,000 for a 50 percent loss ratio and 4 percent growth
OK everyone, please tell me how a New Jersey auto insurer goes from a 116 percent to a 63 percent PIP loss ratio in only one year.
Because of the random nature of individual accidents, it makes sense to measure the average loss ratio for large groups of policies and not individual policyholders.
For other types of residual market plans - joint underwriting associations, reinsurance facilities and a state fund - the total calendar-year loss ratio of 113.
If an average HMO can get the medical loss ratio to 85 or 90 percent, there are IPAs that are highly functioning that can get the medical loss ratio to about 65 percent.
For example, when the June 1993 contract was first introduced in December of 1992, the market formed some sort of expectation as to what the catastrophic loss ratio would be for the first quarter of 1993.
The loss ratio has been lower than 75 percent every month since January.