lostness


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lostness

(ˈlɒstnəs)
n
the state of being lost
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
I am trying to breathe more, to love my lostness, to reject the notion that home is one place.
At both levels, inauthentic presence is perpetuated by either active or passive concealment of our lostness and confusion.
In "The Anatomy of Lostness," the marquee essay in the current issue of WLT, Anna Badkhen writes: "In the eye of most townsfolk an artist is already necessarily deranged, wild, rootless, one whose mind wanders--a griot who for her otherness will be buried not in a proper cemetery but inside a tree" (page 40).
Her themes are wandering narratives that match wandering journeys, the disorientations of lostness and homelessness, and the ways that these articulate both the liberatory and the punitive aspects of being at large in the world.
(187) Eliot is here asking us to realize our lostness within the depths of human time, and our inability to see beyond it into the "timeless" realm.
Both Pentecostals and evangelicals share conservative doctrinal views regarding the inspiration and authority of the Bible, the lostness of humankind without Christ, and justification by faith, as well as the priority of evangelism over social action.
I cannot tell you in words how encouraging it was to be with so many church leaders who are so concerned about our nation and its lostness.
We are a society saturated in "lostness," which translates into a longing and hunger for local--local food, local relationships, local bankers.
"This is because they are usually in a state of 'lostness' and vulnerability and this is what they are attracted to at that time."
Thomas Wolfe's The Lost Boy as a starting point to trace the theme of lostness in Southern novels.
Among specific topics are Eliot's rose-garden: some phenomenology and theology in "Burnt Norton," God's little mountains: young Geoffrey Hill and the problem of religious poetry, darkness and lostness: how to read a poem by Judith Wright, Eugenio Montale and "the other truth," and contemplation and concretion: four Marian lyrics.
"The best way to describe my condition was a feeling of endless lostness. I'd grown up with a mum who suffered from manic depression and I was diagnosed as bipolar when studying law at Hull University.