lostness


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lostness

(ˈlɒstnəs)
n
the state of being lost
References in periodicals archive ?
I cannot tell you in words how encouraging it was to be with so many church leaders who are so concerned about our nation and its lostness.
PR That's it, but also a praise for a kind of lyric lostness.
Thomas Wolfe's The Lost Boy as a starting point to trace the theme of lostness in Southern novels.
And it's always the type of lost that invokes a chain of lostness.
Critics and professors routinely attribute the generations lostness to fallout from the Great War and would roundly concur with H.
The idea of the evaluation had made its near orbit and glanced away into the lostness where all work talk finally goes.
As I suggested earlier, these artifacts, by their very lostness, expose a thingly quality in excess of their intersection with particular human lives.
Thus emerges a future as a paradoxical replication of "a still unprocessed past"--"'the coming times' not just in relation to the unalterable past that has produced them, but as themselves a pastness, a lostness, located in an emergent future" (Yeats and Afterwords 5).
anticipation reveals to Dasein its lostness in the they-self, and brings it face to face with the possibility to be itself, primarily unsupported by concern that takes care, but to be itself in passionate, anxious freedom towards death, which is free of the illusions of the they, factical, and certain of itself.
On a reader-response level, Wolfe's story of family tragedy helps students understand childhood lostness in ways that bridge the writer's generation with theirs.