References in classic literature ?
A miser who has parted with a lucky lottery ticket for five shillings, and finds next day he has lost in the bargain five thousand pounds, could not show a blanker countenance than he did on beholding the figure of Mr.
So afflicted to find that his friend has drawn a prize in the lottery of Sainte Guillotine?
I say that love is a lottery in which he who wins, wins death
Phillips protested that they would have a nice comfortable noisy game of lottery tickets, and a little bit of hot supper afterwards.
While the means held out, his speculations had been magnificent, but were chiefly confined, of late years, to such small business as adventures in the lottery.
But he thought of it now as a thing so unattainable and improbable that to have repined would have been like despairing because one had not drawn the first prize in a lottery.
Italy has achieved the dearest wish of her heart and become an independent State--and in so doing she has drawn an elephant in the political lottery.
The persistent servant went on to relate that De Guiche had just invented a new game of lottery, and was teaching it to the ladies.
Then he began his preparation for the lottery of death, while Jane Porter sat wide-eyed and horrified at thought of the thing that she was about to witness.
I might be investin' in lottery tickets, only I ain't.
Observe in a family some old charwoman who can make beds, sweep the floors, carry away the dirty linen, who knows where the silver is kept, how the creditors should be pacified, what persons should be let in and who must be kept out of the house, and such a creature, even if she has all the vices, and is dirty, decrepit, and toothless, or puts into the lottery and steals thirty sous a day for her stake, and you will find the masters like her from habit, talk and consult in her hearing upon even critical matters; she comes and goes, suggests resources, gets on the scent of secrets, brings the rouge or the shawl at the right moment, lets herself be scolded and pushed downstairs, and the next morning reappears smiling with an excellent bouillon.
I forget, by-the-bye, whether that Miss Browndock was the same lady that got the ten thousand pounds prize in the lottery, but I think she was; indeed, now I come to think of it, I am sure she was.