loudness


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Related to loudness: loudness unit, Loudness war

loud

 (loud)
adj. loud·er, loud·est
1. Characterized by high volume and intensity. Used of sound: a loud whistle.
2. Producing sound of high volume and intensity: a loud construction work site.
3. Clamorous and insistent: loud denials.
4.
a. Having strikingly bright colors: a loud necktie. See garish.
b. Having a very strong or overpowering odor.
adv. louder, loudest
In a loud manner.

[Middle English, from Old English hlūd; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]

loud′ly adv.
loud′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.loudness - the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction)loudness - the magnitude of sound (usually in a specified direction); "the kids played their music at full volume"
sound property - an attribute of sound
crescendo - (music) a gradual increase in loudness
fortissimo, forte - (music) loud
softness - a sound property that is free from loudness or stridency; "and in softness almost beyond hearing"
2.loudness - tasteless showinessloudness - tasteless showiness      
tastelessness - inelegance indicated by a lack of good taste
Translations
إرتِفاع الصَّوْت
hlučnost
støjniveau
correction physiologique
hangosság
hávaîi
yüksek seslilik

loudness

[ˈlaʊdnɪs] N
1. [of bang, explosion] → estrépito m
we couldn't hear because of the loudness of the musicla música estaba tan alta que no nos dejaba oír
2. [of clothes, colour] → lo llamativo

loudness

n
(= volume)Lautstärke f; the loudness of his voiceseine laute Stimme
(= obtrusiveness)Aufdringlichkeit f; (of colour)Grellheit f; (of clothes)Buntheit f

loudness

[ˈlaʊdnɪs] n (see adj) → forza, fragorosità, rumorosità, chiassosità

loud

(laud) adjective
1. making a great sound; not quiet. a loud voice; loud music.
2. showy; too bright and harsh. loud colours; a loud shirt.
ˈloudly adverb
ˈloudness noun
ˌloud-ˈhailer noun
a simple type of loudspeaker. The police used a loud-hailer to tell the crowd to get back.
ˌloudˈspeaker noun
1. an instrument for increasing the loudness of sounds so that they can be heard further away. The politician addressed the crowds from his car through a loudspeaker.
2. a speaker in a radio, record-player etc.
References in classic literature ?
To judge from the conduct of the opposite parties, we shall be led to conclude that they will mutually hope to evince the justness of their opinions, and to increase the number of their converts by the loudness of their declamations and the bitterness of their invectives.
There had remained only a general impression of roughness and loudness; and now he scarcely ever noticed her, but to make her the object of a coarse joke.
Levin had lifted his gun, but at the very instant when he was taking aim, the sound of splashing grew louder, came closer, and was joined with the sound of Veslovsky's voice, shouting something with strange loudness. Levin saw he had his gun pointed behind the snipe, but still he fired.
It advanced from behind the mountains of Jura, and the thunder burst at once with frightful loudness from various quarters of the heavens.
In a minute, the number and loudness of the voices indicated that the whole party was collected in and around that secret place.
The older a person grows, Harriet, the more important it is that their manners should not be bad; the more glaring and disgusting any loudness, or coarseness, or awkwardness becomes.
de Treville; but a fresh allusion soon brought back the conversation to his Eminence, and then the laughter recovered its loudness and the light was not withheld from any of his actions.
'Descend into that same valley we descried yesterday.' rejoined Toby, with a rapidity and loudness of utterance that almost led me to suspect he had been slyly devouring the broadside of an ox in some of the adjoining thickets.
Was it sleeplessness, or noise without?--The cry of the Bete du Bon Dieu rang out with sinister loudness from the end of the park.
At half-past nine he rose and went to the City, and she was almost free till dinner-time, to make visitations in the kitchen and to scold the servants; to drive abroad and descend upon the tradesmen, who were prodigiously respectful; to leave her cards and her papa's at the great glum respectable houses of their City friends; or to sit alone in the large drawing-room, expecting visitors; and working at a huge piece of worsted by the fire, on the sofa, hard by the great Iphigenia clock, which ticked and tolled with mournful loudness in the dreary room.
Of the loudness of the young lady's voice there could be no sort of doubt.
"O hush, you dreadful little girl!" I implored, catching her by the arm, and terrified beyond measure by the loudness of her mirth.