lounder

lounder

(ˈluːndə; ˈlaʊndə)
vb (tr)
to whack, thrash, or beat severely
n
a severe beating
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Lounder presented one option in which the towns were divided up based on location, but some questioned whether the plan would work with the regulations.
Findings confirms that based on the results of Lounder test, the default equivalence of some of variables like age group, literacy and married or single also has been observed (P>0.05).
ANDREW LOUNDER (alounder@umd.edu) is a doctoral student at the University of Maryland.
Taking out a pen-knife, Mr Bankes tapped * in his drawing-room, which painters had praised, and valued at a higher price than he had given for it * lounder" and that in a moment she would fidget and fight with James as usual.
(Company lounder and president Dave Cook, a product designer who loves to "create structural innovation in an existing product," acknowledges that his knife design will take some getting used to.
Inc., Manchester; associate national director, Dianne Beaton, Secondwind Water Systems, Manchester; national director, Everett Lounder, E.J.
Mainstream discourses on the raid and the ensuing trial focused on the sexual activity of the Barracks patrons including the sordid details of men's sexual encounters (Crook 1981; Lounder and English 1981; Mironowicz 1981; Toronto Star 1981; Toronto Sun 1981).
Better a panhandler than the Hare Krishna costumed like Bozo the clown, who is lounder than any panhandler and much more obnoxious, or that beautiful black nun, doomed to spend her rapidly fading youth silently holding her bowl near the Times Square token booth.
"(The authority's) commitment to it is just one more sign of strength that, as a collective, we've made a wise choice," said Greg Lounder, executive director of the municipal committee.