loury


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lou·ry

 (lour′ē)
adj.
Variant of lowery.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

loury

or

lowery

adj
dull, gloomy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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lowery

also loury
adjective
Characterized by or expressive of a foreboding somberness:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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We were all, indeed, as Martin Luther King had recently written (in a different context) from Birmingham Jail, part of an "inescapable network of mutuality." It is impossible now to know whether King, had he not been on that balcony on that afternoon in Memphis, would have been able to alter or even affect the discussion of race by black and white, the mutually desired but--as detailed by Loury and Patterson--chronically difficult working toward a truer national reconciliation; impossible to know whether his growing marginalization would have continued apace, or whether the wider implications of his vision would have been acknowledged.
Loury (1997) states that it is useful to focus on young workers because their earnings are more likely to reflect current labor market conditions.
Loury is at pains to insist that "this discussion is theoretical," denying that he has evidence of its significance in the real world.
Glenn Loury, professor of economics at Boston University.
In an interview with Brown University economist Glenn Loury, discussing affirmative action, Wax mentioned how racial preferences hinder the ability of blacks to succeed academically by admitting them into schools at which they are in over their heads academically.
Loury, a professor of sociology and anthropology at Arcadia University, knows about all too well, the accomplishments of Black males, she says, often go unnoticed.
You may remember that last fall, the Reporter's former publisher and Barbershop co-host, Alden Loury, left to take a job at the Better Government Association.
In a column published in 1996 in The American Enterprise, "What's Wrong With the Right," Glenn Loury, once a prominent black conservative, explains his defection from the right.
Loury. "How to Mend Affirmative Action" The Public Interest 127 (Spring 1997): 33-43.
It might start with a polite hearing for a centrist like Glenn Loury, who writes in The New Republic that "religious traditionalists rightly decry" such cultural problems as "radical individualism, moral relativism, and materialism." Before long one has moved on to stronger stuff, such as the key communitarian text Habits of the Heart, by veteran left-labor academic Robert Bellah, et al.
As part of this Special Report, we asked black leaders Julian Bond, Kurt Schmoke, Glenn Loury, Ward Connerly, and Armstrong Williams to give their opinions on affirmative action.
Toward the end of Liberal Racism, Sleeper introduces Harvard's Randall Kennedy, who rejected racial solidarity in a recent Atlantic Monthly, and Boston University's Glen Loury, a fallen conservative darling.