louvre

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lou·ver

also lou·vre  (lo͞o′vər)
n.
1.
a. A framed opening, as in a wall, door, or window, fitted with fixed or movable horizontal slats for admitting air or light and often for shedding rain.
b. One of the slats used in such an opening.
c. One of the narrow openings formed by such slats.
2. A slatted, ventilating opening, as on the hood of a motor vehicle.
3. A lantern-shaped cupola on the roof of a medieval building for admitting air and providing for the escape of smoke.

[Middle English lover, skylight, chimney, from Old French, from Middle Dutch love, gallery, from Middle High German lauble.]

lou′vered adj.

louvre

(ˈluːvə) or

louver

n
1. (Architecture)
a. any of a set of horizontal parallel slats in a door or window, sloping outwards to throw off rain and admit air
b. Also called: louvre boards the slats together with the frame supporting them
2. (Architecture) architect a lantern or turret that allows smoke to escape
[C14: from Old French lovier, of obscure origin]

Louvre

(French luvrə)
n
(Placename) the national museum and art gallery of France, in Paris: formerly a royal palace, begun in 1546; used for its present purpose since 1793
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.louvre - an art museum that is a famous tourist attraction in ParisLouvre - an art museum that is a famous tourist attraction in Paris
capital of France, City of Light, French capital, Paris - the capital and largest city of France; and international center of culture and commerce
2.louvre - one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rainlouvre - one of a set of parallel slats in a door or window to admit air and reject rain
jalousie - a shutter made of angled slats
slat, spline - a thin strip (wood or metal)
Translations

louvre

louver (US) [ˈluːvəʳ] N (Archit) → lumbrera f; (= blind) → persiana f

louvre

[ˈluːvər] (British) louver (US) adj [door, window] → à claire-voie

louvre

, (US) louver
nJalousie f; louvre doorLamellentür f

louvre

louver (Am) [ˈluːvəʳ] adj (door, window) → con apertura a gelosia
References in periodicals archive ?
quantities of buildings uyw: Steel doors t0, One wing 8, Steel doors t30, One and two louvers 12 pcs, steel doors t90, One winged 8, metal frame glass doors t0, Single and double-leafed 3 pieces, metal frame glass doors t30, Single leaf 14 pcs, Steel sliding door 350 x 300 cm 1 pc.
TBW tests louvers in accordance with AMCA test standard 500-L.
MATERIALS * Plastic tote large enough to hold six 1-gallon jugs (18-gallon totes work well) * 12-volt fan, preferably a small, high-velocity fan with louvers (a small 120-volt fan will also work) * 4- to 5-inch round grate or, if your fan doesn't have louvers, a small household floor vent with louvers * Towel or pad for the tote to sit on to prevent condensation from getting on your floor, table, or stand * Six 1-gallon jugs of frozen water TOOLS * Marker * Sharp utility knife * Duct tape (optional) (1) On one of the small ends of your tote, trace around the outer case of your fan.
Louvers ensure the privacy of the occupants of the house.
The new exterior facade features continuous vertical louvers that cover the existing facades and new buildings.
Design face velocities lower than 500 fpm, except for outdoor louvers, are indicated--300 fpm for a 10-year payback 400 fpm for a 5-year payback.
The designer designed the louvers to be vertical, and wanted to gate the part in the center, hiding the gate mark with a company logo cemented on top.
Before Christmas I had an urgent call from a client in Wirral whose interior grate of his antique period fireplace had totally collapsed; actually the bottom of the grate had fractured and the iron louvers, a rare feature, had rusted and disintegrated.
Louvers shed water toward the outside but do not prevent the entry of wind-blown rain or rain drawn into the assembly by the PTAC fan.
Designed by MDIM Architects, the building features a series of vertical louvers that allow light and air to enter each home, while also providing shade throughout the day and privacy during the evenings.
The collection offers a wide range of colors to match both modern and traditional architecture, and is suited for window frames, curtain walls, shutters, louvers, and wall panels.
During the 1970s and '80s, the best argument for using parabolic louvers was energy savings.