low blow


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low blow

n.
1. Sports An illegal blow in boxing that lands below the opponent's waist.
2. An unscrupulous attack; an insult.

low′ blow′


n.
1. an illegal blow below an opponent's waist in boxing.
2. an unfair or unsportsmanlike criticism or attack.
[1950–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.low blow - unscrupulous abuse
contumely, insult, revilement, vilification, abuse - a rude expression intended to offend or hurt; "when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse"; "they yelled insults at the visiting team"
References in periodicals archive ?
The two-time world champion says being branded a quitter, because his corner threw in the towel when Crawford hit him with a low blow, hurt him deeply.
He could not continue after a body shot in the eighth round - but there was an element of controversy as Metcalf had been docked a point for a low blow earlier in the round.
The fourth round saw Rodriguez (30-8 26 KOs) get bloodied after an accidental headbutt while the fifth round featured Duno losing a point for hitting his opponent with a low blow.
The 32-year-old was withdrawn in the sixth round at New York's Madison Square Garden on Saturday after Crawford threw a low blow, and he has since been heavily criticised by both the champion and neutral observers.
Khan suffered the fifth loss of his boxing career via TKO following a low blow. According to (https://www.cbssports.com/boxing/news/amir-khan-was-peeing-blood-after-terence-crawfords-below-the-belt-shot-lead-to-tko-in-title-fight/) CBS Sports , Khan said that he did not quit, although it was his trainer who called for a stop to the fight.
The 32-year-old was withdrawn in the sixth round at New York's Madison Square Garden after Crawford threw a low blow, and he has Amir Khan since been heavily criticised by both the champion and observers.
American Terence Crawford retained his WBO welterweight title Saturday, stopping Amir Khan in the sixth round when the Englishman was unable to continue because of an accidental low blow. Crawford, who was making the second defence of his title, had little trouble controlling the fight and winning by a technical knockout against the overmatched Khan.
Much of that respect vanished the second trainer Virgil Hunter told referee David Fields he could not continue against Crawford because of a low blow.
Much of that respect vanished on Saturday night the A-second trainer Virgil Hunter told referee David Fields he could not continue against Crawford because of a low blow.
Crawford denied it was a low blow but the referee saw it differently.
One low blow caught on video was that of Mark Barroca on Banchero.
The Mexican was awkward throughout the three rounds on Friday night, rolling around on the canvas after a borderline low blow while he was reluctant to engage at any stage.