lowballing


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low·ball

(lō′bôl′)
tr.v. low·balled, low·bal·ling, low·balls Informal
To underestimate or understate (a cost) deliberately: "I get hopping mad every time I see a politician lowballing the cost of his latest healthcare boondoggle" (Megan McArdle).

[From the card game of the same name.]

low′ball′ adj.

lowballing

(ˈləʊˌbɔːlɪŋ)
n
the practice of offering a customer a deceptively low price
References in periodicals archive ?
The department aid Rivera disregarded the NY AIP rating manual and engaged in lowballing, making low premium estimates on applications for competitive purposes.
Bieber's decision not to resolve his claim fairly and fully," but he was forced to go through with the suit because the company was "lowballing" him.
The insurers told the WSJ the drug cost overestimates in the bidding process were a result of unpredictable pricing by manufacturers — and a concern that lowballing their forecasts would lead to financial losses.
Newcastle have had similar issues this week with the sale ofMatz Selsto Anderlecht with the Belgian side lowballing the Magpies with an offer that fell [pounds sterling]500,000 short of their valuation of the goalkeeper.
Even if you specify all relevant transaction features, some loan officers will quote a price below the price they could actually deliver that day, a process called "lowballing." The purpose is to win the bidding contest against competitors so that you will come back.
Arqaam also said it doesn't expect the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency to fine any banks as a result of its request that lenders stop lowballing interbank rate submissions.
He said the nuclear negotiations with the G5+1 are progressing well, but "they are lowballing with regard to certain issues that we had agreed on."
No lowballing. If your desired candidate is unemployed, don't make the mistake of extending an offer that is equal to--or even worse, less than--what she was earning in her previous position.
Highbrow lowballing, I call it!" Gareth Brand "A seasoned comic who is truly unique and on any given day can produce an awe-inspiring performance.
As a result, the FSA did not respond rapidly to clues that lowballing might be occurring.'
They ought "to stop lowballing expectations for our kids," he said, adding that "the solution to low test scores is not lowering standards--it's tougher, clearer standards." In March 2010, Secretary of Education Arne Duncan accused educators of having "lowered the bar" so they could meet the requirements set by the federal education law, No Child Left Behind (NCLB), which requires that all students be proficient in reading and math by the year 2014.