lowliness


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Related to lowliness: humbleness

low·ly

 (lō′lē)
adj. low·li·er, low·li·est
1. Having or suited for a low rank or position.
2. Humble or meek in manner.
3. Plain or prosaic in nature.
adv.
1. In a low manner, condition, or position.
2. In a meek or humble manner.
3. Low in sound.

low′li·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lowliness - the state of being humble and unimportantlowliness - the state of being humble and unimportant
obscurity - an obscure and unimportant standing; not well known; "he worked in obscurity for many years"
2.lowliness - a position of inferior status; low in station or rank or fortune or estimation
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
inferiority, lower rank, lower status - the state of being inferior

lowliness

noun
Lack of vanity or self-importance:
Translations
وَداعَه ، وضاعَه
chudobnostnízkost
underordnethedydmyghed
auîmÿkt, undirgefni
alçaklık

lowliness

[ˈləʊlɪnɪs] Nhumildad f

lowliness

nBescheidenheit f; (of position, birth also)Niedrigkeit f

low1

(ləu) adjective
1. not at or reaching up to a great distance from the ground, sea-level etc. low hills; a low ceiling; This chair is too low for the child.
2. making little sound; not loud. She spoke in a low voice.
3. at the bottom of the range of musical sounds. That note is too low for a female voice.
4. small. a low price.
5. not strong; weak or feeble. The fire was very low.
6. near the bottom in grade, rank, class etc. low temperatures; the lower classes.
adverb
in or to a low position, manner or state. The ball flew low over the net.
ˈlower verb
1. to make or become less high. She lowered her voice.
2. to let down. He lowered the blinds.
ˈlowly adjective
of low rank; humble.
ˈlowliness noun
ˈlow-down adjective
mean; contemptible. a low-down thief.
ˈlowland adjective
of or concerning lowlands. lowland districts.
ˈlowlander noun
a person who lives in the lowlands.
ˈlowlands noun plural
land which is low compared with other, higher land.
ˈlow-lying adjective
(of land) at a height not much above sea-level.
low-ˈtech noun
technology using simple tools and unsophisticated equipment and methods.
adjective
low-tech industries/skills.
low tide/water
the time when the sea is lowest at a particular place during ebb-tide. There is three feet of water in the harbour, even at low water.
be low on
not to have enough of. I'll have to go to the supermarket – we're low on coffee and sugar.
References in classic literature ?
So spake our Sire, and by his count'nance seemd Entring on studious thoughts abstruse, which EVE Perceaving where she sat retir'd in sight, With lowliness Majestic from her seat, And Grace that won who saw to wish her stay, Rose, and went forth among her Fruits and Flours, To visit how they prosper'd, bud and bloom, Her Nurserie; they at her coming sprung And toucht by her fair tendance gladlier grew.
Then Dinah told how the good news had been brought, and how the mind of God towards the poor had been made manifest in the life of Jesus, dwelling on its lowliness and its acts of mercy.
It may gratify the pride of aristocracy to reflect that disease, more than any other circumstance of human life, pays due observance to the distinctions which rank and wealth, and poverty and lowliness, have established among mankind.
He was not flattered by it; he even felt a slight shame at his lowliness that permitted it.
But in spite of his meekness and lowliness, I fancied I caught the first note of a nascent bitterness in him when he said:
For pride, she said with great severity, was one of the seven deadly sins, and humility and lowliness of heart were virtues.
He sought reversal and renunciation as the signs of his earthly aspirations to lowliness before God.
In a letter of 1547 called "Concerning the Lowliness of Christ," Marpeck issued a scathing critique of the Schmalkadic War and the Christian use of violence.
Instead he argues that the "dependence and vulnerability" that MacIntyre claims for nature should be supplemented by a "theological contemplation," especially "the lowliness of the cross" (7-8).
Theanor is a lowly man whom his marriage would have elevated, and lacking it, he finds perverse solace in descending into an abyss of lowliness, declaring and compounding his now certain ruin by the ruin of what would have saved him.
Later Pope Plus X contrasted the loftiness of the teachers with the lowliness of the laity: "The church is essentially an unequal society .
Here Paul contrasts human wisdom, which the Corinthians value, with the paradox of the cross and the lowliness of the apostle.