lowness


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low 1

 (lō)
adj. low·er, low·est
1.
a. Having little relative height; not high or tall: a low wall.
b. Rising only slightly above surrounding surfaces: a low hill.
c. Near to the ground or the horizon: The low clouds threaten rain. The sun is low.
d. Situated or placed below normal height: a low lighting fixture.
e. Situated below the surrounding surfaces: water standing in low spots.
f. Of less than usual or average depth; shallow: The river is low.
g. Cut to show the wearer's neck and chest; décolleté: a low neckline.
h. Close or closer to a reference point: was low in the offensive zone, near the goal.
i. Linguistics Produced with part or all of the tongue depressed, as a, pronounced (ä), in father. Used of vowels.
2.
a. Below average in degree, intensity, or amount: a low temperature.
b. Below an average or a standard: low wages; a low level of communication.
c. Ranked near the beginning of an ascending series or scale: a low number; a low grade of oil.
d. Relating to or being latitudes nearest to the equator.
e. Relatively small. Used of a cost, price, or other value: a low fee; a low income.
3.
a. Not loud; soft: a low murmur.
b. Having a pitch corresponding to a relatively small number of sound-wave cycles per second.
4. Below others in status or rank; lowly: of low birth.
5.
a. Violating standards of morality or decency; base: a low stunt to pull. See Synonyms at base2.
b. Unrefined; coarse: low humor.
6.
a. Being near depletion: My savings account is low.
b. Not adequately provided or equipped; short: low on supplies.
7.
a. Lacking strength or vigor; weak: a patient whose condition is low.
b. Lacking liveliness or good spirits; discouraged or dejected: feeling low after losing the game.
8. Depreciatory; disparaging: a low opinion of him.
9. Of, relating to, or being the gear configuration or setting, as in an automotive transmission, that produces the least vehicular speed with respect to engine speed.
adv. low·er, low·est
1.
a. In or to a low position, level, or space: aimed low; bent low.
b. In or to a low condition or rank; humbly: thought low of himself.
2. In or to a reduced, humbled, or degraded condition: brought low by failure.
3. Softly; quietly: speak low.
4. With a deep pitch: sang low.
5. At a small price: bought low and sold high.
n.
1. A low level, position, or degree: Rain collects in the lows. The stock market fell to a new low.
2. Meteorology A region of atmospheric pressure that is below normal.
3. The low gear configuration of a transmission.

[Middle English loue, from Old Norse lāgr; see legh- in Indo-European roots.]

low′ness n.

low 2

 (lō)
n.
The characteristic sound uttered by cattle; a moo.
intr.v. lowed, low·ing, lows
To utter the sound made by cattle; moo.

[From Middle English lowen, to moo, from Old English hlōwan; see kelə- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lowness - a position of inferior status; low in station or rank or fortune or estimation
status, position - the relative position or standing of things or especially persons in a society; "he had the status of a minor"; "the novel attained the status of a classic"; "atheists do not enjoy a favorable position in American life"
inferiority, lower rank, lower status - the state of being inferior
2.lowness - a feeling of low spirits; "he felt responsible for her lowness of spirits"
sadness, unhappiness - emotions experienced when not in a state of well-being
3.lowness - the quality of being low; lacking height; "he was suddenly aware of the lowness of the ceiling"
height, tallness - the vertical dimension of extension; distance from the base of something to the top
squatness, stubbiness - the property of being short and broad
truncation, shortness - the property of being truncated or short
loftiness, highness - the quality of being high or lofty
4.lowness - a low or small degree of any quality (amount or force or temperature etc.); "he took advantage of the lowness of interest rates"
degree, level, grade - a position on a scale of intensity or amount or quality; "a moderate grade of intelligence"; "a high level of care is required"; "it is all a matter of degree"
Translations

lowness

[ˈləʊnɪs] N [of shelf, voice, number, temperature] → lo bajo; [of note] → lo grave; [of stocks, supplies] → escasez f; [of rank] → lo bajo; [of character] → vileza f, bajeza f; [of joke, song] → lo verde
lowness of spiritsabatimiento m

lowness

n
Niedrigkeit f; (of bow, note)Tiefe f; (of food, supplies)Knappheit f; (of light)Gedämpftheit f; (of sun, shares)niedriger Stand; (pej)Minderwertigkeit f; lowness of a riverniedriger Wasserstand eines Flusses
the lowness of her voiceihre leise Stimme
(of birth, rank)Niedrigkeit f; (of taste, manners)Gewöhnlichkeit f; (of character)Schlechtheit f, → Schlechtigkeit f; (of joke)Geschmacklosigkeit f; (of trick)Gemeinheit f
(of resistance, morale)Schwäche f; the present lowness of his spiritsseine gegenwärtige Niedergeschlagenheit

lowness

[ˈləʊnɪs] n (gen) → bassezza
References in classic literature ?
I am rather of a jealous temper too by nature, and from our different situations in life, from his being so much more in the world than me, and our continual separation, I was enough inclined for suspicion, to have found out the truth in an instant, if there had been the slightest alteration in his behaviour to me when we met, or any lowness of spirits that I could not account for, or if he had talked more of one lady than another, or seemed in any respect less happy at Longstaple than he used to be.
But through all the confusion and lowness of spirits in which we had been, so unexpectedly to me, involved, I plainly discerned that Mr.
The separate States or confederacies would be necessitated by mutual jealousy to avoid the temptations to that kind of trade by the lowness of their duties.
The present unhappy state of the family rendered any other excuse for the lowness of her spirits unnecessary; nothing, therefore, could be fairly conjectured from THAT, though Elizabeth, who was by this time tolerably well acquainted with her own feelings, was perfectly aware that, had she known nothing of Darcy, she could have borne the dread of Lydia's infamy somewhat better.
There were two other traits, moreover, by which I could always detect them; - a guarded lowness of tone in conversation, and a more than ordinary extension of the thumb in a direction at right angles with the fingers.
He had very good spirits, which never seemed much affected by his wife's occasional lowness, bore with her unreasonableness sometimes to Anne's admiration, and upon the whole, though there was very often a little disagreement (in which she had sometimes more share than she wished, being appealed to by both parties), they might pass for a happy couple.
The pictures of the Dedlocks past and gone have seemed to vanish into the damp walls in mere lowness of spirits, as the housekeeper has passed along the old rooms shutting up the shutters.
A peculiar strangeness was produced by the lowness of the electric light, which lay upon the ground, casting all shadows upwards and making a grotesque shadow figure of himself and his bearers on the airship sides, fusing all three of them into a monstrous animal with attenuated legs and an immense fan-like humped body.
Seelee was more intelligent than the average of his kind, but his intelligence only emphasized the lowness of that kind.
The trial was a farce, but such lowness of life was depressing to contemplate when he considered the long upward climb humanity must make.
As luck would have it, Miss Squeers's friend was of a playful turn, and hearing Nicholas sigh, she took it into her head to rally the lovers on their lowness of spirits.
Still, important as it was to economize the gas, the excessive lowness of the surrounding temperature obliged them to consume a certain quantity.