lubra

lubra

(ˈluːbrə)
n
Austral an Aboriginal woman
[C19: from a native Australian language]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
DMD Lubra Star: Our most popular liquid additive, it reduces torque and friction, prevents sticking, lubricates many aspects of the bore and is invaluable as an additive for pipe pull.
this survivor is a lubra of the Shadow tribe who have lived here since time began in their passing will anyone notice?
The vellum was also ornamented with appropriate pen and ink sketches, one representing a mia-mia with a blackfellow, lubra, and children, the others representing a kangaroo, an emeu, and a native dog, the whole being surrounded with a border combining waddies, spears, shields, fishing-nets, and other implements in use amongst the natives.
In December 2005 and January 2006, a severe wildfire (known as the Mt Lubra Fire) burnt 46% of the Grampians National Park and adjoining areas in western Victoria, especially around the Moyston district (Fig.
Not accidentally, the main clay sculpture of the temple of Piintsokling in Lubra (figure 10.1) was refurbished, as can be seen from the uneven surfaces, and not redone.
Johnson, "Effects of diet, temperature and photoperiod on development and survival of the bigeyed bug, Geocoris lubra," BioControl, vol.
This was Sarhanna, aged eight, son of an Afghan and a lubra. His mother had died when he was a baby.
The Ya-ngal are often placed alongside Mtshe-mi and Gco as the personal priests of the first Tibetan king, and they are famous as one of the key priestly clans in Lubra, in northern Nepal; see Snellgrove, The Nine Ways of Bon, 4-5 (above, n.
This plangent cry is echoed in poems like 'The Lament of the Lubra' (pp.34-6),
"White Lubra / White Savage: Pituri and Colonialist Fantasy in Charles Chauvel's Uncivilised." PS 24.2-3 (2005): 48-63.
'No', I said, 'I will not give you a shilling, I will go and give you some bread,' and he held his hand out to me and said 'Me plenty sulky you long time ago, you plenty sulky me; no sulky now, Derimut soon die,' and then he pointed with a plaintive manner, which they can affect, to the Bank of Victoria, he said, 'You see, Mr Hull, Bank of Victoria, all this mine, all along here Derimut's once; no matter now, me soon tumble down.' I said, 'Have you no children?' and he flew into a passion immediately, 'Why me have lubra? Why me have picanninny?