luckenbooth


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luckenbooth

(ˈlʌkənˌbuːθ)
n
a booth or shop capable of being locked upthe name given to an area of a town with such booths
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Stirling County RFC, Bridgehaugh LUCKENBOOTH: Stirling Folk Club welcomes Christine, Mhairi and Alex who have been playing together for more than 15 years.
It's known as a Luckenbooth brooch after the luckenbooths, or locked booths, from which jewellers traded around St Giles Kirk in Edinburgh in the 18th century.
The star buy here was the Luckenbooth brooch which I chanced upon in a charity shop in the Lake District.
In a description of Strathcona's native town of Forres, for example, we are told about the luckenbooth pins, shaped like a pair of interlocked hearts and given as love tokens.
And on Monday November 26 trio Luckenbooth, who have been together for 15 years, will play an array of instruments including keyboard, whistles, percussion, fiddle, viola, mandolin, and flute.
I actually had a very good response from both the public and councillors when I suggested in one of my columns that Luckenbooths should return to the Royal Mile, and certainly that would be something that works on several levels.
In an example of a genre we might call the colonisation advice manual, George Scot reprints in 1685 a letter from Charles Gordon to Andrew Irvine, 'Merchant at his shop in the East End of the Luckenbooths' (right where Ramsay would later have his shop), in which he counsels that colonists to New Jersey may live not only comfortably but acquire great wealth if they are wise in 'Merchandising'.
In an article in The Academy the writer laments the loss of the Luckenbooths, demolished at the beginning of the nineteenth century, and the more recent loss of 'the separate identity' of the Goosepie.
Besides the Luckenbooths, where Ramsay had his shop and circulating library, were additional shops from which he worked and traded.